diggings


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diggings

[‚dig·iŋz]
(science and technology)
Excavated materials.
A place of excavating.
References in classic literature ?
Dorothy and Toto and the shaggy man came to a halt before the little boy, who kept on digging in a sober and persistent fashion.
I also weighed very carefully the possibility of our digging a way out in a direction away from the pit, but the chances of our emerging within sight of some sentinel fighting-machine seemed at first too great.
If they have it they will lose no time in trying to find the right place to start digging and then they'll begin excavating.
She became more conscious of him when the direction of his digging brought him closer.
More than one, in digging underneath the wheel, was dangerously injured by the splinters of stone.
Still, they had not come upon Flintwinch yet; so the sturdy digging and shovelling and carrying away went on without intermission by night and by day.
He had relinquished his digging and, after a long, stealthy glance towards the house, had advanced to the extreme boundary of the potato patch.
Some of them were digging, others were wheeling barrowloads of earth along planks, while others stood about doing nothing.
Fresh air, and digging, and skipping-rope had made her feel so comfortably tired that she fell asleep.
It was not a night in which any credible witness was likely to be straying about a cemetery, so the three men who were there, digging into the grave of Henry Armstrong, felt reasonably secure.
I had a sexton, when I was clerk, that should have dug three graves while he is digging one.
Some were on ladders, digging in the thatch of the house or the farm buildings, from which they brought out guns, swords, and different weapons of war; others carried them away; and by the sound of mattock blows from somewhere farther down the brae, I suppose they buried them.