Dike

(redirected from dikes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.

Dike:

see HoraeHorae
, in Greek religion and mythology, goddesses of the seasons; daughters of Zeus and Themis. Although they controlled the recurrence of the seasons, they also attended other gods and had no cults of their own. The number and names of the Horae differed from region to region.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

dike,

in technology: see leveelevee
[Fr.,=raised], embankment built along a river to prevent flooding by high water. Levees are the oldest and the most extensively used method of flood control. They are constructed by piling earth on a surface that has been cleared of vegetation and leveled.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Dike

 

a hydroengineering installation, analogous in structure to an earth dam.

A distinction is made between pressure and nonpressure dikes. Pressure dikes are installed to protect river and maritime coastal lowlands from flooding, as canal embankments (protective dikes), and for joining together pressure hydroengineering complexes with banks (conjunction dikes). Nonpressure dikes are erected for guiding a current flow for the purpose of regulating and straightening out river beds and for improving the conditions of navigation and operation of water-passage and water-collecting hydroengineering installations (hydroelectric power plants, water-spillway dams, bridge openings, pumping stations, and so on). Nonpressure dikes may be nonsubmersible or submersible; depending on the position of the dike in relation to the direction of the current, dikes are called longitudinal or transverse. Dikes are usually constructed of materials found in the immediate area (for the most part, rock waste); small dikes are made of earth, brush, stacked fascines, and so on.


Dike

 

an intrusive magmatic body that is bounded by parallel planes and that cuts the rocks that contain the dike. Dikes often consist of rock that is harder than the surrounding rock, and for this reason erosion causes them to protrude in the form of walls. Dikes accompany the formation of effusive and intrusive rock or form independent belts joined by magmatic hearths at great depths. A distinction is also made between radiating dikes, which spread from a common center, and ring dikes. Sometimes dikes are an indication of the presence of minerals (gold or polymetals, for instance).

dike

[dīk]
(civil engineering)
An embankment constructed on dry ground along a riverbank to prevent overflow of lowlands and to retain floodwater.
(geology)
A tabular body of igneous rock that cuts across adjacent rocks or cuts massive rocks.

dike, dyke

1. A dry stone wall.
2. A long low dam.
3. A bank of earth from an excavation.
4. An earth embankment which acts as a coffer-dam for keeping water out of an excavation.

Dike

one of Horae; personification of natural law and justice. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 85]
See: Justice

dyke

, dike
1. an embankment constructed to prevent flooding, keep out the sea, etc.
2. a ditch or watercourse
3. a bank made of earth excavated for and placed alongside a ditch
4. Scot a wall, esp a dry-stone wall
5. a vertical or near-vertical wall-like body of igneous rock intruded into cracks in older rock

dike

To remove or disable a portion of something, as a wire from a computer or a subroutine from a program. A standard slogan is "When in doubt, dike it out". (The implication is that it is usually more effective to attack software problems by reducing complexity than by increasing it.) The word "dikes" is widely used among mechanics and engineers to mean "diagonal cutters", especially the heavy-duty metal-cutting version, but may also refer to a kind of wire-cutters used by electronics technicians. To "dike something out" means to use such cutters to remove something. Indeed, the TMRC Dictionary defined dike as "to attack with dikes". Among hackers this term has been metaphorically extended to informational objects such as sections of code.
References in classic literature ?
So thus the band journeyed along the causeway between the dikes, till at last they reached the great gate of Emmet Priory.
I say it's common sense, as Pivart's dikes must do me an injury.
He then somehow scrambled into the saddle, and with a "Gee up" and a clap on my sides with both his legs, he started on his journey, making a little circuit to avoid the dike.
Southward, the high ridge of the sea dike, and the grim, massive circle of a martello tower reared high on its mound of grass, closed the view darkly on all that lay beyond.
Two mornings after this little scene, although the day was rainy and gusty, and Amelia had had an exceedingly wakeful night, listening to the wind roaring, and pitying all travellers by land and by water, yet she got up early and insisted upon taking a walk on the Dike with Georgy; and there she paced as the rain beat into her face, and she looked out westward across the dark sea line and over the swollen billows which came tumbling and frothing to the shore.
A hundred fears poured one over the other into the little heart, as fast as the waves on to the Dike.
It was an empty house which had been torn down by the gunpowder, and the grim old colour sergeant of the war was still teaching discipline to the miners of Iron Dike.
The intended use of surface waters includes construction of two dikes damming with permanent transfers and basins wypadowymi in place of the natural valley unnamed watercourse.
One important issue in designing the spur dikes is the phenomenon of their tip local scouring which is due to narrowing the cross-flow and the strong eddy flows.
When the Wachusett Reservoir was constructed at the turn of the last century, the earthen dams - or dikes - were intended to remain free of trees and shrubs to ensure their integrity.
It's a big strain on their subsistence economy to take the time to rebuild the dikes.