dilution factor


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dilution factor

[də′lü·shən ‚fak·tər]
(electromagnetism)
The energy density of a radiation field divided by the equilibrium value for radiation of the same color temperature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Across the 6 assay methods, the computed dilution factor variances, expressed as CV, were 2.
The dilution factor from A1 to A1D1 was verified by this method to within 0.
To calculate the MPN in the original sample, divide the tabular MPN by the dilution factor corresponding to [p.
But others worry that actual concentrations in the environment could be higher than the calculated PEC due to the guidance's assumed 1:10 dilution factor for sewage effluent entering rivers.
87) consisting of three predictors: (I) dilution factor related to the loading of wastewater treatment plant effluents; (2) organic matter content of the sediment; and (3) percent forested land cover in the drainage area of the sampling site.
134 gallons), a dilution factor of about 75 would be expected for a 10-gallon composite sample, which translates to a lead concentration of about 4 [[micro]gram]/L.
In the summer time when we have runoff the dilution factor is enough so it doesn't create a problem, but in the winter months it creates a terrible problem, and I don't think it needs to be.
If the house were much lower, the dilution factor might be only 10,000 to 1.
Result parameters include information on the number of viable cells/mL, percent viability, total cells/mL, total viable cells in original sample, total cells in original sample, dilution factor (input value), original volume (input value), sample number and sample ID.
Additionally, how the regression dilution factor applies to dichotomous data is not clear, although it is applicable to survival and logistic regression as well as to bivariate quantitative data (5).
This reportedly reflects the application of a dilution factor and a refinement of the recovery estimates, which when applied to the cut-off grade precipitates these minor changes in the resource estimate with respect to tonnages and grade.
To obtain the concentration (in mg/ml) of the original extract, multiply X by the dilution factor (for example, 25).