diminution

(redirected from diminutive)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

diminution

Music the presentation of the subject of a fugue, etc., in which the note values are reduced in length

Diminution

The decrease in size of a column toward the top; typically employed as a device to overcome or correct an optical appearance of the top being larger than the bottom.

diminution

[‚dim·ə′nü·shən]
(botany)
Increasing simplification of inflorescences on successive branches.
(computer science)
Limiting the negative effect of an attack on a computer system.
References in classic literature ?
I was then sure that you reflected upon the diminutive figure of Chantilly.
Macerinus, a diminutive, means leanish, poorish, out of case.
They are rather a diminutive race, generally below five feet five inches, with crooked legs and thick ankles - a deformity caused by their passing so much of their time sitting or squatting upon the calves of their legs and their heels, in the bottom of their canoes - a favorite position, which they retain, even when on shore.
But at the end of a quarter of an hour, dropping his eyes, he perceived a small pug-dog squatted upon the path near his feet--a diminutive but very perfect specimen of its interesting species.
Two ladies, rivals in fashionable life who tormented one another with a thousand little stings of womanish spite, were given to understand that each of their hearts was a nest of diminutive snakes, which did quite as much mischief as one great one.
By the time that it wanted only three minutes to noon, the droll object in question was perceived to be a very diminutive foreign-looking young man.
Diminutive paintings give that spotty look to a room, which is the blemish of so many a fine work of Art overtouched.
The two most remarkable are a young man who presents all the characteristics of a period of national decadence; reminding me strongly of some diminutive Hellenised Roman of the third century.
We gather that it conveyed originally an idea of size and power, not as now in the diminutive of both these meanings.
Do you refer to Lorenzo il Magnifico, or to Lorenzo, Duke of Urbino, or to Lorenzo surnamed Lorenzino on account of his diminutive stature?
She was a pretty, very diminutive, plump woman of from forty to fifty, with handsome eyes, though they had a curious habit of seeming to look a long way off.
I could not think of a safer asylum than this, if we must spend the night upon the premises; and Raffles agreed with me when I had led him by sheltering shrubbery and perilous lawn to the diminutive chalet between the rhododendrons and the water.