dimmer

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dimmer

1. a device, such as a rheostat, for varying the current through an electric light and thus changing the illumination
2. US
a. a dipped headlight on a road vehicle
b. a parking light on a car

Dimmer

A solid-state device used to vary the voltage to a light fixture and thereby lower or raise the intensity of the light. Used mainly for incandescent lamps and fluorescent lamps with special ballasts. Also called a rheostat, it can be installed on a wall switch or directly into a lamp and can easily be added to existing installations.

dimmer

[′dim·ər]
(electricity)
An electrical or electronic control for varying the intensity of a lamp or other light source.

dimmer

A device which varies the light intensity of a light source without appreciably affecting the spatial distribution of the light; usually an electric control device that varies the current flow and hence the light output of the lamp. dimmer room A room in which are located the dimmers for controlling the lights for an auditorium or theater.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anyway, that's what dimmer switches are for" - Actress Julia Roberts, who put on weight for a new film.
The dimming signal should be universal and non-proprietary, so all dimmer switches and lamps would be compatible.
DIMMER switches could be put on street lights in a bid to save a council cash and cut its carbon footprint.
There are also fears non-standard fittings won't take new bulbs and the fact most are incompatible with dimmer switches.
In two rooms I have dimmer switches and as I've discovered energy saving light bulbs aren't compatible with them.
From spotlights to showcase artwork or photo frames, dimmer switches to create cosy, more intimate lighting to mood lighting and reading lamps, lighting plays an important part in the home.
But I still have a problem with a number of lights with dimmer switches.
They cannot be used with dimmer switches or electronically-triggered security lights and cannot be used in microwaves, ovens or freezers because they will not function above 60c or below 20c.
The base-level devices run about $19, and the dimmer switches will start at $45.
The National Electrical Code now requires larger box sizes to accommodate a wide range of bulky devices like dimmer switches and ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs).
DON'T Use energy-efficient bulbs with dimmer switches.
They are putting more effort into new designs that accommodate compact fluorescent bulbs, use electronic ballasts and incorporate dimmer switches and automatic controls.