diner

(redirected from dine)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to dine: Disney

diner,

restaurant resembling the railroad dining car. In the mid-19th cent., the first dining cars that appeared on trains were nothing more than an empty car with a fastened-down table. George M. Pullman, who had begun producing sleeping cars in 1858, soon began designing a dining car. By 1868, Pullman had designed the luxuriously and meticulously appointed "club car." Roadside diners, however, evolved from horse-drawn lunch wagons, whose origins date to the 1870s. Such wagons became more elaborate in the late 19th cent., and many became roadside fixtures on empty lots. Although some railroad dining cars were sold and turned into roadside restaurants, most roadside diners were factory-built restaurants that were assembled on their permanent site. Instead of the tables and white tablecloths of the early dining cars, they commonly had booths along one wall and a long counter down the other. In the 1920s and 30s, the diners that served America's growing highway system became a symbol of automobile travel. Diners from that era were sometimes art decoart deco
or art moderne
, term that designates a style of design that originated in French luxury goods shortly before World War I and became ubiquitously and internationally popular during the 1920s and 30s.
..... Click the link for more information.
 in design, sleek and streamlined.

Bibliography

See study by R. J. S. Gutman (1993).

Diner

A restaurant with a long counter and booths, originally sloped like a railroad car. Diners were designed as stationary evolutions of the railroad dining car minus the wheels. They usually had a counter with stools and a row of booths opposite. They featured large windows around the exterior above the level of the booths.

diner

1. a person eating a meal, esp in a restaurant
2. Chiefly US and Canadian a small restaurant, often at the roadside
3. a fashionable bar, or a section of one, where food is served
References in classic literature ?
Well, Mester Massey," said Adam, as Bartle came up "I'm going to dine upstairs with you to-day: the captain's sent me orders.
Charles Musgrove, indeed, afterwards, shewed more of inclination; "the child was going on so well, and he wished so much to be introduced to Captain Wentworth, that, perhaps, he might join them in the evening; he would not dine from home, but he might walk in for half an hour.
His father very much wished him to meet Captain Wentworth, and there being no sufficient reason against it, he ought to go; and it ended in his making a bold, public declaration, when he came in from shooting, of his meaning to dress directly, and dine at the other house.
Anne was now at hand to take up her own cause, and the sincerity of her manner being soon sufficient to convince him, where conviction was at least very agreeable, he had no farther scruples as to her being left to dine alone, though he still wanted her to join them in the evening, when the child might be at rest for the night, and kindly urged her to let him come and fetch her, but she was quite unpersuadable; and this being the case, she had ere long the pleasure of seeing them set off together in high spirits.
I suppose an ordinary member couldn't dine in there alone?
Since you do not, you will permit me to point out that being asked to dinner is one thing; being asked to dine is another and a different thing.
I was on my way to dine all by my lonely self when you came tumbling around the corner.
It was only when we returned to the pavilion at six o'clock, that we decided, my daughter and I, to dine there.
He also wanted to be sure that the forest-keeper knew that the professor and his daughter were going to dine in the laboratory, and how he had come to know it.
Osborne's family and dependants in good humour, and to make as many friends as possible for George in his hour of adversity, William Dobbin, who knew the effect which good dinners and good wines have upon the soul of man, wrote off immediately on his return to his inn the most hospitable of invitations to Thomas Chopper, Esquire, begging that gentleman to dine with him at the Slaughters' next day.
Oblonsky did dine at home: the conversation was general, and his wife, speaking to him, addressed him as "Stiva," as she had not done before.
WASHINGTON, May 4, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As the most popular holiday of the year to dine out, Mother's Day will entice nearly half of Americans to dine out or order restaurant takeout or delivery on May 10.