dioctahedral

dioctahedral

[‚dī‚äk·tə′hē·drəl]
(crystallography)
Pertaining to a crystal structure in which only two of the three available octahedrally coordinated positions are occupied.
(mathematics)
Having 16 faces.
References in periodicals archive ?
1993, The near-infrared combination band frequencies of dioctahedral smectites, micas, and illites.
The position of the 060 reflection is useful in distinguishing between dioctahedral and trioctahedral species (Fig.
Request for quotations: delivery of drugs (inn: dioctahedral smectite)
Phengite, a dioctahedral mica similar to muscovite, and glauconite and illite belong to the phyllosilicate group.
AEM characterization of phyllosilicates (Table 2) revealed that dioctahedral smectites are Al-dominant (between 1.
2) It consists of a dioctahedral 1:1 layer structure with a general composition of [Al.
The dioctahedral chlorite typically have more intense [003] reflections and retain their [002] peaks after heat treatment.
Two types of octahedral sheets occur in clay minerals: dioctahedral, where two-thirds of the octahedral sites are occupied by trivalent cations, such as [Al.
Anti-diarrheal effects of a combination of Korean traditional herbal extracts and Dioctahedral Smectite on Piglet diarrhea caused by Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.
Rectorite (REC), another type of layered silicate material, is defined as a 1:1 type of layer structure arranged regularly with an alternating dioctahedral mica layer and dioctahedral smectite layer.
In general, vermiculite can be dioctahedral or trioctahedral, but trioctahedral type is common in soils with a similar morphology to that of mica (Moore and Reynolds 1997), as observed in vermiculite (Figure 3).
This is possibly because, in an oxidising environment, the octahedral Fe is oxidised and imparts to the mineral a dioctahedral character, holding K more tenaciously (Rich 1972) because of short K-O distance and larger K H distance in dioctahedral mineral.