Inhibitor

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inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Efficacy and safety of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled on glimepiride alone or on glimepiride and metformin.
Efficacy and safety of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor alogliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes and inadequate glycemic control: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.
Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability of single and multiple doses of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor alogliptin in Japanese healthy male subjects.
Incretin therapies: Highlighting common features and differences in the modes of action of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.
1 The list includes 'traditional' drugs such as sulfonylureas and metformin, 'newer' drugs like dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP4I) and sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2I), and injectables, e.
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This trial failed to show any cardiovascular benefit of the drug in patients with diabetes and a recent acute coronary syndrome, as did several other trials looking at cardiovascular outcomes in high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes treated with drugs including insulin, thiazolidinediones, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.
The firm stated that sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors remove excess glucose via the urine by blocking glucose re-absorption in the kidney, while dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors work by increasing hormones that stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin and stimulate the liver to produce less glucose.
Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4): Independently, DPP-4s have been shown to carry a low risk of hypoglycemia, and evidence suggests that they are suitable to use during Ramadan.
of Birmingham, UK) and Grice, a medical writer from France, overview the new drugs and treatments developed recently to improve glycemic management for diabetic patients and how they can be translated into primary care, especially the incretin mimetics (glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

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