diploidization

diploidization

[‚di‚plȯid·ə′zā·shən]
(genetics)
The process by which a tetraploid organism attains the diploid state, involving repeated chromosome loss.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The viable resultant gynogens from hybridization may be the result of male chromosome elimination and spontaneous diploidization of the maternal chromosome set (SDM) (Ye et al.
Evidence for the heritable nature of spontaneous diploidization in common carp, Cyprinus carpio L.
Allopolyploid evolution coupled with diploidization may also facilitate the formation of new species capable of utilizing unique niches via plasticity and subsequent niche specialization.
By means of diploidization processes, such as chromosomal rearrangements, intergenome recombination, and gene silencing, the genomic constitution of many extant taxa might be the outcome of ancient hybridization and polyploidy (Bowers et al.
Soltis & Rieseberg, 1986), and it has frequently been proposed that genetic diploidization of polyploids is a more or less universal phenomenon (e.
Spontaneous diploidization of the maternal chromosome set was shown to occur in hybrid larvae, as 2.
8% respectively, which suggests that spontaneous diploidization of the maternal chromosome set (SDM) had occurred in a portion of hybrid larvae.
To resolve the paradox of high chromosome numbers and diploid gene expression in ferns, Haufler (1987) hypothesized that they have acquired their high chromosome numbers through repeated cycles of polyploidization and genome diploidization via gene silencing.
Therefore, results from the past studies have largely support the Haufler hypothesis of repeated cycles of polyploidization and diploidization, and this phenomenon seems to explain the high chromosome numbers in ferns.