care

(redirected from direct care)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
Through this agreement with Minnesota, we hope to empower direct care workers who support the physical, social, emotional, and employment needs of people with disabilities to develop the necessary skills and competencies of supported individuals so that they are better able to live satisfying, successful, and self-directed lives," said Hajo Oltmanns, Senior Vice President, Performance & Services, Elsevier.
It also provides a vehicle for ongoing dialogue between hospitals, direct care providers, and patients that facilitate a dynamic and relevant approach to health care and patient safety.
Electronic surveys of direct care RN's were collected on 42% (n = 200) of participating staff RNs.
Nationally, the average wage paid to a direct care worker in 2009 was $10.
There are also areas where lack of agreement perpetuates repeated discussions; one of those being whether a standard curriculum should apply to all direct care workers that can still meet the needs of a full-time, part-time, and intermittent workforce fulfilling an array of functions.
This year, TNA presented the Award for Nursing Excellence to winners in the four areas of Nursing Administration, Advanced Practice, Direct Care and Education.
17) Kristin Smith and Regan Baughman, Low Wages Prevalent in Direct Care and Child Care Workforce (Durham, NH, Carsey Institute, summer 2007).
The Bush administration's New Freedom Initiative working in cooperation with the Department of Health and Human Services, has initiated nationally-funded demonstration projects designed to address workforce shortages of community service direct care workers (New Freedom Initiative, 2002).
A clear expectation of the role was that matrons would provide leadership to direct care staff and would provide a visible, accessible and authoritative presence in the organisation.
The Auditor General identified situations where provincial monies were not used for the direct care and maintenance of Hydra residents, but instead were used for the benefit of Hydra executives and others.
Priority will be given to those managers and staff working in direct care roles in children's homes, adult care homes and domiciliary care.
Second, did they modify direct care expenditures to achieve greater congruence between cost of care and resident acuity?

Full browser ?