direct glare

direct glare

Results from high luminances directly visible from a viewer’s position. See also: Glare

direct glare

Glare resulting from high brightness or insufficiently shielded light sources in the field of view or from reflecting areas of high brightness.
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Electric fixture sizes and design, as well as use of uplight, might be considered to avoid direct glare.
In view of the fast-changing dynamics of present-day politics in India, uttering such frustrating profanities as "Congress tradition" and keeping Rahul away from the direct glare of a much-anticipated aACAyModi-vs-Rahul' bout can only be counter-productive if Congress is at all serious about giving BJP a run for its money.
Temperatures on the tracks were affected by the direct glare of the sun, with Kincardine in Fife reaching 43C.
In fact, I don't think we've used the big light in decades as we prefer diffusion, in all its degrees, to direct glare.
All of this in the direct glare of a bus full of labourers on their way to work.
Mullin is working with Albert Titus, cochair of UB's Department of Biomedical Engineering, on producing sunglasses that combine sensors and miniaturized electronics to identify and reduce direct glare 10 to 100 times more than conventional brands.
Our products let users see more in glare situations than ever before, because they reduce direct glare 10 to 100 times more than any other sunglasses," says Mullin, adding, "when there is no glare, it's just a pair of sunglasses.
Chris Mullin states, "Our products let users see more in glare situations than ever before, because they reduce direct glare ten to one hundred times more than any other sunglasses.
Older eyes also become more sensitive to glare--both direct glare (from a directly visible lighting source, such as an unshielded bulb) and indirect glare (a consequence of bright light bouncing off reflective surfaces, such as shiny floors).
The accurate cut of each individual prism guarantees all-round glare control and excludes direct glare and reflections on flat screens.
If aesthetics is your chief motivation, don't aim directional lighting at the front door if the view of any visitors will be obscured by the direct glare.
Direct glare causes the eye to have to adapt to widely differing illumination levels which causes eyestrain.