direct proportion

(redirected from direct ratio)

direct proportion

[də′rekt prə′pȯr·shən]
(mathematics)
A statement that the ratio of two variable quantities is equal to a constant.
References in classic literature ?
In the matter of wills, personal qualities were subordinate to the great fundamental fact of blood; and to be determined in the distribution of your property by caprice, and not make your legacies bear a direct ratio to degrees of kinship, was a prospective disgrace that would have embittered her life.
The estimation in which these gentlemen were held, according to one of the most scientific exponents of the Gun Club, was "proportional to the masses of their guns, and in the direct ratio of the square of the distances attained by their projectiles.
Still-- if I have read religious history aright--faith, hope, and charity have not always been found in a direct ratio with a sensibility to the three concords, and it is possible--thank Heaven
Perfection of loveliness, they say, is in the direct ratio of the extent of this lump.
Edward Freely was a man whose impulses were kept in due subordination: he held that the desire for sweets and pastry must only be satisfied in a direct ratio with the power of paying for them.
In fact, the facility with which I shall arrive, or have arrived, at the solution of this mystery, is in the direct ratio of its apparent insolubility in the eyes of the police.
That item is labor content (teacher and professor salaries/benefits) as they relate to a percentage of operating costs in a direct ratio to the number of students graduated.
This solution reduces the strains of the constitutive parts with a value in direct ratio with the one of the transmission ratio for this gear.
It is good to choose the amount of franchisees in direct ratio to the total number: if there are only 10 franchisees, perhaps two of them could represent the others until the system grows.
Perhaps there is a direct ratio between the number of viewings and centimetres of rainfall?
The point remains that an advanced knowledge of the happenings taking place within a literary work may actually enhance the essential experience conveyed by the work, for the responsiveness of the audience to that experience is in direct ratio, not to their degree of ignorance concerning the sequence of events within the story, but to their capability for apprehending the immediate dramatic presentation, be it children's book or classical tragedy.
He instinctively turned up the volume in direct ratio to the awkwardness of the question.