directed acyclic graph


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directed acyclic graph

(DAG) A directed graph containing no cycles. This means that if there is a route from node A to node B then there is no way back.
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Some tasks need the data generated by the other tasks; hence, there will be precedence constraints among tasks, and the problem can be modeled using a directed acyclic graph (DAG) so-called task graph.
Here, task scheduling of an application program is represented by a directed acyclic graph (DAG).
The Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) has published a paper in the journal where authors Anthony Bonato, Dieter Mitsche, and Pawel Pralat say that the structure of terror networks can be compared to hierarchical organization in companies and certain online social networks where information flows in one direction from a source to the consumers and are known as hierarchical social networks or directed acyclic graphs (DAGs).
Figure 1 plots the final directed acyclic graph, which is based on the innovations estimated from the VAR model.
This model is a directed acyclic graph (DAG), which means there is no cyclic path from any node.
SGS focus on a special class of graphical models, the Directed Acyclic Graphs (DAGs).
A task partitioning algorithm divides such large applications into tasks of appropriate size and such model of partitioned application is represented by Directed Acyclic Graph.
It is an application program that is represented by a directed acyclic graph (DAG).
We show that the relationships of suppression among nodes induced by a given feedback order can be represented as a directed acyclic graph (DAG).
The use of directed graphs also is not unique to Dryad, as is illustrated by the Directed Acyclic Graph Unified Environment (DAGuE) project at the University of Tennessee's Innovative Computing Laboratory (ICL).
3, the original digraph reduces to a directed acyclic graph (DAG) [2].
A directed acyclic graph is a picture illustrating causal flow between variables with lines with and without arrowheads.