dirty bomb


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dirty bomb

[¦dər·dē ′bäm]
(ordnance)
An explosive based on nuclear fission that emits many long-lived radioactive isotopes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their fresh success has set off new alarms among some lawmakers and officials in Washington about risks that terrorists inside the United States could undertake a dirty bomb attack.
Behrooz Bayat, a former consultant at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), told Trend that "notwithstanding the capability of Armenia for making a dirty bomb, I don't think that Armenia would have any incentive or motivation to deploy a dirty bomb in Azerbaijan because of the geographical entanglement between both countries: radio isotopes do not recognize borders.
Some Iraqi security experts are worried that a cache of radioactive material which went missing last November could be used by the ISIL (Daesh) jihadist group to produce a dirty bomb, according to a report by Reuters.
DIRTY BOMB FEAR Large quantities of Ir-192 have gone missing before in the United States, Britain and other countries, stoking fears among security officials that it could be used to make a dirty bomb.
A senior security official said: "They could simply attach it to explosives to make a dirty bomb.
Tariq, 37, of Dudley, West Mids, wrote online: "O by the way Islamic State does have a Dirty bomb.
Dirty Bomb Shell offers helpful advice for singers facing surgery or other medical procedures: ask questions, understand the impact of the treatment, and make sure all medical personnel involved in your care--from anesthesiologists to nurses--know you are a singer.
While we can be thankful that the highly enriched uranium stocks are no longer in Libya, the remaining material in Tajoura could, if it ended up in the wrong hands, be used as ingredients for dirty bombs.
First of all, if anybody ever doubted the power of a dirty bomb to devastate a nation, both physically and psychologically, their doubts would most probably have been dispelled by events in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 rather than current radiation leaks from nuclear power plants.
If a dirty bomb were to go off, scientists could spray the sticky gel onto buildings.
When convicted terrorist Jose Padilla showed up at the Chicago airport in May 2002 allegedly with plans to carry out a dirty bomb attack, few people had ever heard of such a weapon.
Her comments on the dirty bomb threat come after police in Slovakia arrested three men suspected of trying to sell contraband uranium for EUR1 million (pounds 500,000).