disable

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disable

[dis′ā·bəl]
(computer science)
To prevent some action from being carried out.
To turn off a computer system or a piece of equipment.

disable

To turn off; deactivate. See disabled.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Damned for Their Difference, Branson and Miller have presented a wide sweep of Western history (mostly British), linking the advent of the modern bureaucratic state with the disabling of the deaf minority population.
Longer term career planning issues, including issues related to career fulfillment and consideration of the interaction between occupational demands and implications associated with the progression of a disabling problem, often were overshadowed by the imminent focus on returning people with disabilities to the workforce.
In Milwaukee, Wisconsin Myrna Cohen, who has worked for years in shopping center management, was stricken with a disabling neurological condition that left her in a wheelchair.
Disabling conditions frequently are associated with severe oral disease and dysfunction of the craniofacial complex.
This evaluation report relates specifically to the system performance focusing on real-time tracking accuracy, anti-hijacking, disabling features and remote controlled functions.
The data provided by the interviewees revealed a pattern of negativity that related to some aspect of their disabling condition.
AlphaTrak(TM) can be used in locating and disabling automobiles that are sold to the "credit challenged" market.
As a rule, disabling conditions are considered high cost, non-emergent, and low priority conditions, subject to budgetary thresholds and to IHS servicewide management philosophy, constraints which limit not only the range of services rendered, but the number of people served by local facilities.
Of the 23 different disabling conditions reported by participants, four disabilities - polio (n=154-), spinal cord injured (SCI) Paraplegia (n=90), visual impairment (n=59), and SCI quadriplegia (n=55) - accounted for 72 percent of participating alumni.
On the contrary, it may be primarily the product of a disabling environment.
Chronic, disabling illness is the major health problem of older persons.
Acceptance of disability is perceived as a realization of the difficulty of disabling conditions, but, at the same time stresses the intrinsic value and ability of individuals (Thorenson & Kerr, 1978).