descant

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descant

Music
1. a decorative counterpoint added above a basic melody
2. of or pertaining to the highest member in common use of a family of musical instruments
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165: 'Sorores que viginti quatuor annos transcenderunt, si nesciunt psalterium, de novo non discant.
From the end of the 14th century (but outside the territory of Bohemia, although one of the manuscripts is today kept in a Prague library) we also know instrumental paraphrases of popular vocal pieces (preserved for example in the codices Faenza 117, "Reina" or the Prague National Library XI E 9), in which the originally sung discant part is richly adorned, while the "accompanying" tenor (and sometimes contratenor) remains in almost unaltered form.
The case for Proba 2 is not put in jeopardy by the scornful comments of Jerome in a letter to Paulinus of Nola,(19) in which he laments that centos were penned by all sorts of inadequates: hanc (scripturarum ars) garrula anus, hanc delirus senex, hanc soleocista verbosus, hanc universi praesumunt, lacerant, docent, antequam discant.
base of the nut, you forget plainsong, discant, melody on which discant is raised" (my emphasis; notebook for Gardens of Old Men, box 1).
The reader will need to decide the extent to which the harmonic style of the melismatic sections may vary from the style in the discant passages.
b) The Tenor is so called, becaus it was commonly in Motets the ditti-part or Plain-song: which continued in the same kind of notes (usually briefs) much after one plain fashion: uppon which the other parses did discant in sundry sortes of Figures, and after many different ways: or (if you will) becaus neither ascending to any high or strained note, nor descending very low, it continueth in one ordinari tenor of the voice and therefore may be sung by an indifferent voice.
15) In 1491/2, these two singers were joined by Johannes den Mangelere, paid because he had helped to sing discant for a long time without receiving his due, and Chaerle, the nephew of the zangmeester, Nicasius of Ghent, who had also sung without pay.
Deum vis haec Deum / Deum abditum hoc arbitrium est, / Ut, qui natantis dispuunt regnum trabis, / Parere discant Viperae.
These constructs relate to the once living musical practice to the extent that they mirror simple discant clausulas, early motets, and even brief segments of some larger organa.
Next, by comparing the formats of 16th- and 17th-century recorders with ranges, cleffing, and part designations in surviving compositions and treatises, Van Heyghem concludes that Italian solo literature at the turn of the 17th century was performed on a discant recorder in g and in very few cases on sopranos either in d' or in c'.
the Discant cadence comprises the final proceeding to the seventh degree, and returning to the final; and the Bass cadence consists of the final proceeding to the fifth and back again).
Thus, since in the Florence manuscript no two-part clausulae are found separated from the main group, the entire contents of this volume are the 46: clausulae of the fifth fascicle; corresponding discant passages recorded within the full organa dupla series have not been extracted, but will appear in subsequent volumes.