discoid

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discoid

[′dis‚kȯid]
(biology)
Being flat and circular in form.
Any structure shaped like a disc.
References in periodicals archive ?
6] The reported incidence of discoid meniscus ranges from 0.
Discoid meniscus was classified according to Watanabe et al where if the meniscus occupied more than 80% of the tibial plateau it is considered as complete type and less than 80% but wider than usual is called as incomplete type and as a Wrisberg ligament.
Discoid meniscus, one of the most common anatomic variations of the meniscus, was first described in cadavers by Young in 1889.
sup][7] In addition, there are also some other anatomical knee variants that are associated with discoid meniscus, including hypoplasia or dysplasia of femoral condyle,[sup][9],[10] fibular head, lateral tibial spine [sup][11] and plateau.
The prevalence of a medial discoid meniscus in patients with AIMM is much greater than in a discoid lateral meniscus, and the prevalence of the transverse ligament is comparable to the general population.
22) Other criteria used to diagnose lateral discoid meniscus include the following:
There are different classifications for discoid meniscus being Watanabe, the most accepted, in which discoid meniscus is classified into three different types according to the arthroscopic aspect: type I or complete, type II or incomplete, and type III or Wrisberg-ligament type in which the posterior meniscofemoral attachment is absent resulting in an unstable meniscus with hypermobility [5].
A complete medial discoid meniscus with a partial longitudinal tear in red zone of the body and posterior horn was found.
Coronal and sagittal MRI of the right knee showed Grade III discoid meniscus tear.
3 years, and thus the patients may have been too young for the discoid meniscus to lead to malalignment or degenerative changes in the knee.
On MR, the diagnosis of a discoid meniscus is suggested by identifying either meniscal tissue on three continuous sagittal 5-mm-thick slices, or a meniscal body on coronal images greater than 15mm wide or extending into the intercondylar notch.