discomfort glare

discomfort glare

[dis′kəm·fərt ‚gler]
(communications)

discomfort glare

Glare that is distracting or uncomfortable, interfering with the perception of visual information required to satisfy biological needs, it does not significantly reduce the ability to see information needed for activities. See also: Glare

discomfort glare

A low-level glare that causes discomfort and annoyance, but does not necessarily impair vision or visual performance.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Bargary et al compared normal participants with high and low discomfort glare thresholds while they identified the orientation of a Landolt C surrounded by peripheral sources of glare.
New and different criteria--such as brightness, circadian stimulation, discomfort glare, dynamic properties, movement and color saturation--are often much more useful in telling us how well the lighting achieves our goals in a certain context.
Its low reflection design helps to reduce discomfort glare.
Discomfort glare reduces the contrast of visibility of the object being viewed, while intense glare can lead to temporary vision impairment.
It's important to mention that the major factor affecting discomfort glare sensation is high source luminance [Chauvel and others 1982; Chauvel and Perraudeau 1995; Nazzal and Oki 2007].
In the case of excessively high luminance contrast or glass (mirror) surfaces in industrial buildings or working with computers, disability or discomfort glare may develop.
either fixed or free) does not significantly impact perceptions of discomfort glare in the context of oncoming headlamps (Bullough et al.
Lighting engineers make a distinction between discomfort glare, which may not necessarily affect visual performance, and disability glare, which does.
The subjective sensation of discomfort referred to as discomfort glare is determined subjectively, primarily by rating scales.
Cut veiling reflections, particularly through more indirect light distribution, and get rid of discomfort glare.