discomfort glare

discomfort glare

[dis′kəm·fərt ‚gler]
(communications)

discomfort glare

Glare that is distracting or uncomfortable, interfering with the perception of visual information required to satisfy biological needs, it does not significantly reduce the ability to see information needed for activities. See also: Glare

discomfort glare

A low-level glare that causes discomfort and annoyance, but does not necessarily impair vision or visual performance.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lili is perfect for healthcare environments where discomfort glare is unwanted by patients but a 50,000-hour sustainable lighting solution is needed.
Discomfort glare reduces the contrast of visibility of the object being viewed, while intense glare can lead to temporary vision impairment.
It's important to mention that the major factor affecting discomfort glare sensation is high source luminance [Chauvel and others 1982; Chauvel and Perraudeau 1995; Nazzal and Oki 2007].
either fixed or free) does not significantly impact perceptions of discomfort glare in the context of oncoming headlamps (Bullough et al.
The first grant was awarded to the University of Idaho for the "Identification of Discomfort Glare from Vertical Fenestration and Occupant Control Scenarios.
Discomfort glare is a visual annoyance caused by luminance in the field-of-view that is considerably greater than the luminance to which the visual system is adapted [IES 2011].
While both disabilty and discomfort glare do affect driver performance, their effects are more indirect and are relative to the age of the driver.
In addition to the successful IES Research Symposium entitled "Light + Seniors," we are now preparing two draft RFPs: chronospectural, spectral sensitivities and their impact on circadian rhythms; and discomfort glare from vertical windows and mitigation strategies.
The electronic office introduced in the 1980s brought new concerns in lighting design [Blehm and others 2005], mainly the prevention of disability and discomfort glare in VDT operators [Osterhaus 1993].
The window is typically a source of discomfort glare due to the brightness of either the backlit shading system itself or direct views of the sun or sky through the window.