discrimination


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discrimination

Electronics the selection of a signal having a particular frequency, amplitude, phase, etc., effected by the elimination of other signals by means of a discriminator

discrimination

the process by which a member, or members, of a socially defined group is, or are, treated differently (especially unfairly) because of his/her/their membership of that group. To be selected for less favourable treatment, a social group may be constructed by reference to such features as race, ethnicity, gender or religion. A distinction can be drawn between ‘categorical’ and 'S tatistical’ discrimination. Categorical discrimination is the unfavourable treatment of all persons socially assigned to a particular social category because the discriminator believes that this discrimination is required by his social group. Statistical discrimination refers to less favourable treatment of individuals based on the belief that there is a probability that their membership of a social group leads to them possessing less desirable characteristics.

In the UK, there are laws that deal with both sex and race discrimination: the Sex Discrimination Act (1975) and the Race Relations Act (1976). In both Acts, ‘direct’ discrimination is made illegal, in that a person may not be treated less favourably than another on the grounds of gender, colour, ethnicity or race. However, the Race Relations Act also attempts to tackle ‘indirect’ discrimination. This was defined as consisting of treatment which may be described as equal in a formal sense, as between different racial groups, but discriminatory in its effect upon a particular racial group. Indirect discrimination is the application of conditions or requirements which may mean that:' (1) the proportion of persons of a racial group who can comply with these is considerably smaller than the proportion of persons not of that racial group who can comply with them; (2) they are to the detriment of the persons who cannot comply with them; (3) they are not justifiable irrespective of the colour, race, nationality or ethnic or national origins of the person to whom they are applied’ (A Guide to the Race Relations Act 1976 Home Office, 1977). See also POSITIVE DISCRIMINATION, RACE RELATIONS, SEGREGATION, GHETTO, PREJUDICE, SEX DISCRIMINATION.

Discrimination

 

(1) The limitation or deprivation of the rights of certain categories of citizens on the basis of such criteria as race, national origin, and sex. In bourgeois countries racial discrimination is especially widespread—the limitation of rights and persecution of persons for reasons of their racial origin. It is openly practiced in the USA against Indians, Negroes, and Chinese. In the Republic of South Africa the discrimination against East Indians and other non-Boer and non-European populations practiced by the English and Afrikaaners (Boers) has reached large proportions. Widely practiced in capitalist states are such forms of discrimination as lower pay for the labor of women and young people and the limitation of rights on the basis of political and religious convictions.

(2) Discrimination in international relations is the establishment of lesser rights for the representatives, organizations, or citizens of one country than for those of another. The practice of discrimination usually brings about reciprocal measures in the form of retortion on the part of the government against whom it is directed. The USSR and other socialist countries vigorously oppose all forms of discrimination in international relations.

discrimination

[di‚skrim·ə′nā·shən]
(communications)
In frequency-modulated systems, the detection or demodulation of the imposed variations in the frequency of the carriers.
In a tuned circuit, the degree of rejection of unwanted signals.
Of any system or transducer, the difference between the losses at specified frequencies with the system or transducer terminated in specified impedances.
(computer science)

discrimination

discriminationclick for a larger image
The minimum angular distance at which two objects on a radar screen can be seen separately. In the figure, the discrimination capability of the radar is 2°.
References in classic literature ?
But upon what principle is the discrimination of the places of election to be made, in order to answer the purpose of the meditated preference?
And the man of maxims is the popular representative of the minds that are guided in their moral judgment solely by general rules, thinking that these will lead them to justice by a ready-made patent method, without the trouble of exerting patience, discrimination, impartiality,--without any care to assure themselves whether they have the insight that comes from a hardly earned estimate of temptation, or from a life vivid and intense enough to have created a wide fellow-feeling with all that is human.
com Report "Pop Goes the Age Discrimination Bubble"
Sex discrimination can be direct, indirect, harassment or victimisation.
edu/) The University of Texas at Austin's School of Social Work and co-author of the study, said the study results show that the type and the frequency of discrimination play an important factor.
the Netherlands) present a collection that incorporates both Chinese and European perspectives on employment discrimination and anti-discrimination labor law in their respective jurisdictions.
7 million settlement to a black firefighter who claimed racial discrimination.
Damages for discrimination and employment-related claims are included in gross income net of the legal fees and costs, but not less than zero under IRC section 62(a)(20).
The language minority provisions benefit Alaska Natives, American Indians, Asians and Spanish Heritage persons who Congress has found have faced, and continue to face, significant voting discrimination.
1982: Wisconsin becomes the first state to pass a law protecting its gay and lesbian citizens from discrimination in employment and housing.
Rather than assuming that decades of bigotry and malign discrimination--much of it at the behest of governments, a point Anderson barely mentions--should be redressed by decades of pretense and benign discrimination, again at the behest of governments, Washington should have focused its attention on rooting out racist policies in federal employment, education, and contracting, while ensuring under the 14th Amendment that state and local governments did the same.