dishabituation

dishabituation

[‚dis·hə‚bich·ə′wā·shən]
(psychology)
Restoration to full strength of a response that has become weakened by habituation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, both inpatient and day hospital settings were the main sites of treatment, which allow for a close and daily monitoring of patients and its process of detoxification and dishabituation.
It is also possible that the change in task format (from observing the stimuli to choosing them) may produce dishabituation.
Neuronal mechanisms of habituation and dishabituation of the gill-withdrawal reflex in Aplysia.
Stimulus omission and dishabituation of the skin conductance response.
According to Puddu and Fanos (2012), cognitive functions of habituation and dishabituation allow low-frequency sound perception, while representing the earliest stages of language learning as early as the 27th week of gestation.
One of the properties of habituation is that presentation of an irrelevant stimulus will result in the recovery of the habituated response to the US, termed dishabituation (Groves and Thompson, 1970; Thompson & Spencer, 1966).
Researchers often assess auditory perception in infants by using so-called habituation and dishabituation methods, for example, by measuring non-nutritive sucking or changes in heart rate, all of which, on the present account, qualify as perceptual behaviors.
Orienting, habituation, and information processing: The effects of omission, the role of expectancy, and the problem of dishabituation.
no dishabituation or preferential looking) if the novel colour was from the same category, even though the difference between the original colour and the novel colour was above threshold.
1990) "Habituation and dishabituation of female sexual arousal".
These changes to sensory neuron firing properties contribute to increased reflex responses produced by various forms of learning, including dishabituation, sensitization (both long-term and short-term forms) and classical conditioning (see reviews by Byrne et al.