Disillusionment

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Disillusionment

Adams, Nick
loses innocence through WWI experience. [Am. Lit.: “The Killers”]
Angry Young Men
disillusioned postwar writers of Britain, such as Osborne and Amis. [Br. Lit.: Benét, 37]
Blaine, Amory
world-weary youth, typical of the lost generation that finds life unfulfilling. [Am. Lit.: This Side of Paradise]
Chardon, Lucien
(de Rubempré) young poet realizes he is not destined for success. [Fr. Lit.: Balzac Lost Illusions in Magill II, 595]
Chuzzlewit, Martin
swindled, becomes disillusioned with Americans. [Br. Lit.: Martin Chuzzlewit]
de Lamare, Jeanne
heartbroken by her husband’s neglect and the discovery of his infidelities. [Fr. Lit.: Maupassant A Woman’s Life in Magill I, 1127]
Dodsworth, Sam
disillusioned with wife, European tour, and American situation. [Am. Lit.: Dodsworth]
Eden, Martin
attains success as a writer but loses desire to live when isolated from former friends and disenchanted with new ones. [Am. Lit.: Martin Eden]
Journey to the End of the Night
exposing the philosophy of post-war disillusionment. [Fr. Lit.: Journey to the End of the Night, Magill I, 453–455]
Kennaston, Felix
learns in middle age that his life of romantic dreams was baseless. [Am. Lit.: The Cream of the Jest in Magill I, 168]
Krasov, Kuzma Ilich
frustrated writer considers life complete waste. [Russ. Lit.: The Village]
Loman, Willy
salesman victimized by own and America’s values. [Am. Lit.: Death of a Salesman]
Lost Generation
intellectuals and aesthetes, rootless and disillusioned, who came to maturity during World War I. [Am. Lit.: Benét, 600]
March, Augie
“everyone got bitterness in his chosen thing.” [Am. Lit.: The Adventures of Augie March]
Melody, Cornelius
a failing tavern-keeper, flamboyantly boasts of his past. [Am. Drama: Eugene O’Neill A Touch of the Poet in Benét, 737]
Mysterious Stranger, The
naive youth is convinced by the devil that morals are false, God doesn’t exist, and there is no heaven or hell. [Am. Lit.: Benét, 697]
O’Hanlon, Virginia
(1890–1971) N.Y. Sun editorial dispels her disillusionment about Santa Claus (1897). [Am. Hist.: Rockwell, 188]
Pococurante
wealthy count who has lost his taste for most literature, art, music, and women. [Fr. Lit.: Candide]
Rasselas
prince and his companions search in vain for greater fulfillment than is possible in their Happy Valley. [Br. Lit.: Rasselas in Magill I, 804]
Smith, Winston
clerk loses out in totalitarian world. [Br. Lit.: 1984]
Webber, George
finds his native Southern town has degenerated morally and that his idealized, romantic Germany is corrupted. [Am. Lit.: Thomas Wolfe You Can’t Go Home Again]