disjunction

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disjunction

[dis′jəŋk·shən]
(cell and molecular biology)
Separation of chromatids or homologous chromosomes during anaphase.
(mathematics)
The connection of two statements by the word “or.” Also known as alternation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Disjuncture is often experienced as a tension or frustration, or even stress and distress.
Together, these three articles examine specific sites for some of the practical manifestations of Soudien's disjuncture between 'the law' and 'the rule'.
Adams contends it is the disjuncture between popular willingness to accept war as a guarantor of manliness and the apathetic if not antithetical view of war's relation to manhood as depicted in literature and film that is in large part responsible for perpetuating war's performance; that is, if more citizens understood that war neither makes men nor proves the virility of America, perhaps America could more aptly avoid war's performance.
Across the poems of Debut et fin de la neige, however, the failure to touch--a disjuncture that might seem to impede the poetic project--becomes an enabling device.
Yet, a disjuncture of such an unprecedented scope did lead a large number of men and women in Canada and elsewhere to entertain dramatically different ways of organizing society.
contends that different philosophical heritages are responsible for the disjuncture between philosophy of religion and theology: contemporary theology is shaped most formatively by Kant, who prohibits God-talk, whereas philosophy of religion follows Locke, who subjects God-talk to the same stipulations as ordinary belief.
The plot ostensibly concerns a Korean-American woman living in Queens and her journey back to North Korea to leave her brother's ashes at a Buddhist temple--but at the play's heart throbs the surreal disjuncture of what it was like for Park's family to live as immigrants in Chile.
In this reader's view, this chapter is a somewhat awkward disjuncture to an otherwise excellent and provocative work.
It was becoming the cause of dearth of water in the area while CEO also directed to disjuncture 12,000 illegal water connections.
The disjuncture between the developing and the developed world has been reflected in exchange rates, which have appreciated in real terms for many emerging economies since 2008, although the Chinese yuan has moved up relatively little.
In addition, Frankel asserts that periods of disjuncture and crisis--blood libel, pogroms, revolutions, and wars--played a crucial role in explaining the effervescence of Jewish politics that joined theory and praxis and mobilized large swaths of the Jewish populace intent on transforming the dismal reality of late Imperial Russian society and politics.
And the disjuncture between the "two clocks" has rarely been as striking as at the present--for just as the democracy protests appear to be cresting, the push for war in the U.