disk spring

disk spring

[′disk ‚spriŋ]
(mechanical engineering)
A mechanical spring that consists of a disk or washer supported by one force (distributed by a suitable chuck or holder) at the periphery and by an opposing force on the center or hub of the disk.
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to JETRO, Tokaibane are the number one manufacturer of the iMC spring--or disk spring as they are more commonly known.
The company has been an innovator in the industry since 1948 when it introduced the Negative Rate Disk Spring design that remains the standard today for most aerospace pressure switches.
Considering the mass M of the movable assembly, the disk springs constant K and the coefficient of the force lost in proportion with the velocity b, then the following condition of dynamic balance can be written:
The motors work against the pre-load disk springs and lift up the grinding head from the working area so that the workpieces are no longer driven away from the table.
When restarting the automatic mode of the grinding machine, the two hydraulic cylinders are released by actuating the hydraulic distributors and the disk springs of the two hydraulic cylinders will enable the clamping for all the group to its original position with respect to prop of the grinding machine.
The hydraulics are released, and the disk springs form a positive clamp.
The clamping force is obtained adding the force owing to pressure with the force owing to pre-tension of the assembly disk springs 3.
The disk springs are adequate pre-loaded with the help of a plate.
Heavy-duty disk springs are used to produce a high pull force on the clamp arms.
The hydraulic cylinders are single action type, the rod being extended by the disk springs sets mounted behind the pistons (ON).
In either case, firm locking systems with disk springs should be provided for safety and stiffness reasons.