dispensing

(redirected from dispense)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

dispensing

i. The supply of fuel to aircraft via a hydrant, refueler, or tanker.
ii. The release of chaff, IR (infrared) flares, and any other ECM (electronic countermeasures) payload in a controlled manner.
iii. To release submunitions from a container or a device.
References in classic literature ?
Opium is smoked everywhere, at all times, by men and women, in the Celestial Empire; and, once accustomed to it, the victims cannot dispense with it, except by suffering horrible bodily contortions and agonies.
And, in the second place, we all overlooked the fact that such mechanical intelligence as the Martian possessed was quite able to dispense with muscular exertion at a pinch.
These recognitions alone dispense with the artificial aid of tokens or amulets.
It is true also, that as I did not then know his Eminence, if I had been able to dispense with the visit, I should have been enchanted.
Monsieur," replied the count, with a chilling air, "I am very happy to have been the means of preserving a son to his mother, for they say that the sentiment of maternity is the most holy of all; and the good fortune which occurred to me, monsieur, might have enabled you to dispense with a duty which, in its discharge, confers an undoubtedly great honor; for I am aware that M.
Her younger sisters soon began to make interest with her for objects of happiness which she might in future be able to dispense.
My afternoons were spent also in college, with the exception of an hour that my wife daily exacted of me for her establishment, and with which she would not dispense.
whose aromatic gales dispense To Templars modesty, to Parsons sense.
The reader will dispense with a second description of that habitation: he, perhaps, has been with us there before, and knows it.
Ah, well," said I, much comforted, "then I can very readily dispense with their acquaintance.
It was necessary to rewrite them or to dispense with them.
In the first place he was sorry that Natasha, for whom he cared more than for anyone else in the family, should be lost to the home; and secondly, from his hussar point of view, he regretted not to have been there to show that fellow Bolkonski that connection with him was no such great honor after all, and that if he loved Natasha he might dispense with permission from his dotard father.