dispenser cathode

dispenser cathode

[də′spen·sər ‚kath‚ōd]
(electronics)
An electron tube cathode having provisions for continuously replacing evaporated electron-emitting material.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Supply Of Dispenser cathode of 0.
The most common types of cathode emitters are the oxide cathode and the dispenser cathode.
the dispenser cathode is operated at temperatures below 1000[degrees]C.
Tenders are invited for Supply of M-Type Dispenser Cathode.
Dispenser cathodes represent a quantitative advancement over the oxide cathodes which preceded them.
Even after 20,000 hours of operation, the advanced dispenser cathodes still perform better than the B-type at the beginning of their life.
Waldal remains president of Semicon, located in Lexington, Kentucky, and directs operations, marketing and finance for that division's activities in ceramic impregnated dispenser cathodes and samarium cobalt permanent magnets, primarily for microwave tubes used in radar, satellite communications and military applications.
Improved helix support materials, progress in helix circuit design, superior magnetic materials and the use of dispenser cathodes have bred a class of rugged, long-lived tubes.
Noteworthy are the use of improved helix support materials, in particular boron nitride and diamond with improved thermal conductivity; progress in helix circuit design, in particular the velocity taper which improved efficiency; superior magnetic material in the form of samarium cobalt; and finally the use of dispenser cathodes.
Dispenser cathodes, emissive material embedded in appropriate metallic substrates, operated at temperatures substantially below the coated cathodes they replaced.
Dispenser cathodes employing mixtures of exotic oxides are found in all of the tubes.
4) Dombro cited the use of improved helix support materials (boron nitride and diamond) with improved thermal conductivity; progress in helix circuit design, in particular the velocity taper which improved efficiency; superior magnetic material in the form of samarium cobalt; and finally the use of dispenser cathodes.