dispersant

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dispersant

[di′spərs·ənt]
(materials)
Also known as dispersing agent.
An additive that can hold finely ground materials in suspension; used as a thinning agent for a slurry.
A material added to a paste, mortar, or concrete to improve the flow properties.

dispersant

An admixture which is capable of maintaining finely ground materials in suspension; used as a slurry thinner or grinding aid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Opponents say the dispersants themselves were toxic, that they may have exacerbated environmental damage, and that they were ineffective at breaking up the already dispersed oil erupting from the wellhead.
Oil dispersants are a blend of chemical compounds used to break down oil slicks into smaller drops of oil, making them easily degraded by natural processes or diluted by large volumes of water.
Dispersants were applied to the surface either through aerial spraying or by vessels within 3 nautical miles (5.
They studied the effect of chemical structure of dispersants and concluded that the hydrophilic part should have sufficient length to negate the van der Waals forces.
In the meantime, chemical dispersants, including Corexit 9500A, were used both underwater and on surface to dissipate oil slicks (Kujawinski et al.
ZetaSperse 3800 dispersant is a clear liquid broad utility dispersant applicable across all pigment and particle types in resin-free and resin-minimal systems.
Dispersants (including Specialty Dispersants for Auto Dish)
Clarke developed an ink using a pigment and a reactive polymer so that the pigment and polymer remain soluble without additional dispersants.
Dispersants are the second largest additive in volume with one-fifth of the tons.
Ionic Polymers: The majority of dispersants in aqueous dispersions are based on inexpensive anionic polymers.
Baby" corals of at least some species are vulnerable to Deepwater Horizon oil and are especially likely to die when exposed to dispersants used during a spill, according to a lab-based study by Mote scientists published in the journal PLOS ONE earlier this year.
Pedigo has aggressively challenged the EPA for, as he alleges, "not adhering to the spirit of the very Clean Water Act that the EPA is there to enforce by pre approving toxic Corexit dispersants.