disperse phase


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Related to disperse phase: Continuous phase, Tyndall effect, sol

disperse phase

[də′spərs ‚fāz]
(chemistry)
The phase of a disperse system consisting of particles or droplets of one substance distributed through another system. Also known as discontinuous phase; internal phase.
References in periodicals archive ?
At a given trans-membrane pressure, the membrane thickness is one of the important factors that determine the disperse phase flux.
In order to apply the conditioning formalism, phase indicator functions for the continous phase, I, and the disperse phase, Id, are defined in terms of the Heaviside function [H.
Depth-sensing indentation tests, performed on the continuous and disperse phase of the 40 and 60% ESO samples.
Recently, Zborowski and Canevarolo (23) proposed an in-line procedure to probe the deformation/recovery phenomena of disperse phase droplets in PP/PS dilute mixtures by turbidity in a slit-die attached to a twin-screw extruder.
In immiscible systems, coalescence and breakup of the disperse phase is a collaboration of interfacial tension and viscoelastic properties of the blends (10).
Disperse phase 13 in phase A, add phase C and continue mixing
Apart from the most important factors for homopolymers, such as orientation and crystallization phenomena, the mechanical properties of two-phase systems are also influenced, to a large extent, by the particle size and distribution in the disperse phase.
The second one suggests that it be better to choose the graft copolymer with the matrix polymer as the backbone and the disperse phase polymer as grafts.
As expected, blends containing HDPE show large particles of several micormeter, dispersed phase with large variation of domain size, particles detached from the matrix and absence of surface adhesion of the disperse phase in the matrix, indicating poor interfacial adhesion (Fig.
The melt viscosity ratio of the dispersed phase to that of the matrix and the viscosity of the matrix are two important factors that control the sizes of the disperse phase.
Since this method is based on sophisticated mathematical and geometrical procedures, an image processing technique was applied, which is effective when measuring the extent of disperse phase deformation.
The final properties of an immiscible blend are strongly affected by two important factors: the phase morphology of the system and the interactions between the disperse phase and the matrix.