displacement rate

displacement rate

[dis′plās·mənt ‚rāt]
(petroleum engineering)
In oil well cementing, the speed at which a given volume of cement slurry or mud is pumped down the borehole.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our measure of the job displacement rate rose from 1.
For the group of downsizing industries as a whole, the average displacement rate from 2001-03, at 6.
Commissioner Abraham Jok Ariing told Sudan Tribune that the romping River Nile water instigates instability, halts evaluations of displacement rate and devastates settlement in Baidit Payam.
excavation and installing lining stage (35days), during which the heave displacement rate reduces with an increment of only 2.
Despite the strongest labor market witnessed since the inception of the survey in 1984, the displacement rate did not fall below its all-time low of 2.
Of course, feedback could be used to produce a constant displacement rate in a force-controlled system or a constant loading rate in a displacement-controlled system.
The Bofors MBT Law on the other hand, is not really guided in the same sense as the other missiles examined here, but like the Kestrel seen further on, has some kind of guidance facility in the form of a trajectory prediction system: as the gunner follows the movement of the tank whilst aiming, this swerving movement is recorded by the weapon which, once fired, follows the same slewing rate; should the displacement rate of the target change, the launcher then sends an update laser signal to the missile.
The fraction of workers who are displaced tends to move with the business cycle; however, the displacement rate (the fraction of workers displaced during a given interval) did not fall as much as usual during the earlier phases of the current expansion, leading to concerns that job security had permanently declined (Valletta 1997b; Aaronson and Sullivan 1998).
It can be seen that the displacement rate increased from 6.