display

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display

1. Electronics
a. a device capable of representing information visually, as on a cathode-ray tube screen
b. the information so presented
2. Zoology a pattern of behaviour in birds, fishes, etc., by which the animal attracts attention while it is courting the female, defending its territory, etc.

display

[di′splā]
(electronics)
A visible representation of information, in words, numbers, or drawings, as on the cathode-ray tube screen of a radar set, navigation system, or computer console.
The device on which the information is projected. Also known as display device.
The image of the information.

display

(hardware)

display

(language)
A vector of pointers to activation records. The Nth element points to the activation record containing variables declared at lexical depth N. This allows faster access to variables from outer scopes than the alternative of linked activation records (but most variable accesses are either local or global or occasionally to the immediately enclosing scope). Displays were used in some ALGOL implementations.

display

(1) To show text and graphics on a CRT or flat panel screen.

(2) A screen or monitor.
References in classic literature ?
I am sorry to have to trouble you at a time when you must be so very busy, renewing important engagements, signing fresh ones and generally displaying your excellent taste.
The spirit of enterprise, which characterizes the commercial part of America, has left no occasion of displaying itself unimproved.
It is only to be lamented that any of her citizens should wish to deprive her of the additional merit of displaying its full efficacy in the establishment of the comprehensive system now under her consideration.
Never did Monsieur de Sartines have spies more intelligent and less expensive, or minions who showed more honor while displaying their rascality of mind.
I was aware, however, that his very ancient family had been noted, time out of mind, for a peculiar sensibility of temperament, displaying itself, through long ages, in many works of exalted art, and manifested, of late, in repeated deeds of munificent yet unobtrusive charity, as well as in a passionate devotion to the intricacies, perhaps even more than to the orthodox and easily recognisable beauties of musical science.