disposable

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disposable

[də′spō·zə·bəl]
(engineering)
Within a manufacturing system, designed to be discarded after use and replaced by an identical item, such as a filter element.
References in periodicals archive ?
They demand ease of opening, resealability, disposability, transportation and on the go functionality.
Biolace represents a first step toward a new single-use and disposability mentality, according to the company.
The success of wipes in both consumer and industrial markets derives from the ease-of-use, disposability, portability, and reduced risk of cross-contamination these products offer.
The advent of plastic generation', created serious issues that revolved around plastic usage and its disposability.
The full biodegradability of our fibers is further ensuring a safe and natural disposability of final products," said Heinrich Jakob, marketing and sales nonwovens.
The Hypertronics interconnect conforms to the medical trends of more disposability, embedded electronics, high reliability and sterilization.
These eight women pointed to convenience, disposability and hygiene as their primary motivators for using wipes.
Given the current industry emphasis on disposability and, particularly, the current explosion of companies using bag technology for liquid storage and handling, this new innovation will provide the industry with even greater opportunities to reduce manufacturing cycles, production costs and contamination rates.
Disposability is one of the main reasons hospitals and operating rooms prefer nonwovens over woven fabrics, say most suppliers to the medical industry.
This national media launch will bring to the forefront the ability of the litter to help indicate Feline Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD), as well as its substantially lighter weight and easy disposability.
Considered by many to be a niche delivery technology, transdermal drug patches offer the advantages of ease of use, painlessness, disposability, control of drug delivery and avoidance of first-pass metabolism by the liver.
In this month's Reflections column, consultant Albert Hoyle said we as an industry have worked out our problems--he was commenting specifically on the disposability issue--ethically and profited from it and that this is a philosophy we must continue.