disquisition


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disquisition

a formal written or oral examination of a subject
References in periodicals archive ?
Talking Honeycutt into forking over the money requires a long and complicated disquisition on Spanish maritime history (one of many mercilessly inflicted by screenwriters John Claflin, Daniel Zelman and Andy Tennant, who also directs), which is only half as hard to follow as the plot.
After his moving and elegant disquisition on race in America, many thought he had weathered the storm.
This chapter ends with a lengthy disquisition on Jurgen Moltmann's pneumatology.
In fact, Howard provides more than he promises: an excursus on VAT; a history of the Industrial and Commercial Finance Corporation; pages of spreadsheet formulas; a disquisition on the debt problems of foreign students; and explanations of key models in corporate finance.
The long disquisition of 149 pages dispenses with either sub-sections or divisions, which would have given it at least a look of coherence.
Ian Maclean introduces the volume with a short disquisition on various early modern terms associated with novel ideas in religion and philosophy.
We might even wish the author had written them first, the better to have guided his selection and interpretation of data throughout his disquisition.
Greg Sheridan brought up the rules of engagement in the course of a disquisition on the latest Aussie deployment.
In his book The Italian Job, a hugely entertaining disquisition on the two football cultures with which he is most familiar, Gianluca Vialli explains the different philosophy of his fellow countrymen.
A thorough disquisition on the volume's contents would require a small volume in itself.
The incoherence of his trackside interview was understandable - most of us would struggle to breathe after a lung-bursting 100m dash, let alone deliver a cogent disquisition.
In closing, the president delivered a little disquisition on history to the editors.