disruptive technology

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disruptive technology

A new technology that has a serious impact on the status quo and changes the way people have been dealing with something, perhaps for decades. Throughout history, there have been many disruptive technologies, including the steam engine, electricity, automobile, telephone, integrated circuit (chip) and the Internet.

More recently in the digital world, music CDs wiped out the phonograph industry within a few years (although audiophiles later created somewhat of a renaissance), and digital cameras demolished the film industry. Smartphones with their built-in cameras practically destroyed the stand-alone camera business. Stay tuned!
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Type III urethral disruption is an uncommon injury that occurs primarily in male patients with pelvic trauma.
However, the regular closure of parts of the network for engineering work causes substantial disruption and inconvenience to many passengers and freight customers, as well as deterring others from using the network altogether.
Companies that successfully practice disruption can leapfrog past competitors, completely overhaul a market, and even change the way people think--about, for example, a word like disruption.
In the past decade, airlines have achieved great success using technology to improve the passenger experience, and this year s survey shows a new focus in the area of disruption management.
METAL thieves could be dicing with death while causing huge disruption to homes and businesses by cutting power supplies.
Minor Disruption might include issues such as equipment breakdown, power outage, fire alarm or workforce unrest.
Chew said LTA has recognized that the disruption was serious and they will continue to do checks and minimize such occurrences.
Global Banking News-June 12, 2015--Citi says Australian banks well prepared to beat digital disruptions
Regardless of the cause of disruption, more than half of businesses (57 percent) reported productivity losses as the top negative effect of their network disruptions, primarily due to reduced access to the network itself or to applications, data and communications systems:
Customers are notoriously fickle; if a company can't serve them as the result of a disruption (or for any other reason), they're likely to pack up and go to a competitor who can.
But there is nothing monetary policy can do to offset the direct effects of a severe Y2K disruption As a result, our Year 2000 focus has been in areas in which we can make a difference: conforming our own systems, overseeing the preparations of the banking industry, preparing the payments system, and contingency planning.
Three quarters of businesses experienced at least one supply chain disruption in 2012, with the same percentage admitting they have a complete lack of visibility of their supply chain.