dissect


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dissect

[də′sekt]
(biology)
To divide, cut, and separate into different parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said Lunenburg High School offers an alternative, but does not have enough of the alternatives to allow an entire class to elect not to dissect a real animal.
DISSECT is a word attack strategy for reading unknown, polysyllabic words.
The school district purchased a state-of-the-art computer program for use by students who do not want to dissect a frog.
Dissections are carded out in the vast majority of American high schools, although they've reportedly declined since 1987, when the California Supreme Court supported a high school student's refusal to dissect a frog.
To dissect this infamous machine and its impact on the large African-American community, Gary Rivlin pivots Fire on the Prairie: Chicago's Harold Washington and the Politics of Race on events and personalities surrounding the late Harold Washington's mayoral triumph in 1983.
To try to dissect the minds of the MPAA with regard to what is acceptable can be a black hole of inscrutable logic," says Dawn Hudson of the Independent Feature Project/Los Angeles, who says independent filmmakers have often been left out of the MPAA's decision process.
British Intelligence places him in the worst school situation ever, isolated in the Alps above Grenoble, where he is threatened by a fate worse than death (well, death after the students in biology class dissect him while he is still alive, without anesthetic).
Now we don't have to dissect Barbie legs anymore," Bahor says.
The market focus briefs provide an introduction to speech analytics and dissect trends in its adoption by vertical and global region, while the strategic briefs provide strategic insights for vendors and a step-by-step guide for customers.
in the auditorium at the Church on the Way, 14300 Sherman Way, will be able to watch Los Angeles Police Department command officers dissect area crime patterns.
Luhr teams with contributors from the Smithsonian Institution to dissect various facets of each topic, including rocks, minerals, mountains, geological formations, tropical rain forests, clouds, and forces shaping Earth's surface, such as meteorite impacts, erosion, and soil deposition.
The mass was bluntly dissected from the major vessels of the neck, but it was not possible to dissect it from the vagus nerve.