dissipation factor


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dissipation factor

[‚dis·ə′pā·shən ‚fak·tər]
(electricity)
The inverse of Q, the storage factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
2 Dissipation factor ASTM D150, (1 kHz hour, 23[degrees]C) IEC 60250, -- (10 kHz hour, 23[degrees]C) ASTM D2520 -- (1 MHz hour, 23[degrees]C) -- (1 GHz hour, 23[degrees]C) 0.
Dissipation factor is a measure of ratio of the electric energy dissipated per cycle to energy stored per cycle in an applied electric field.
Next used measuring parameter is dissipation factor tan [delta].
This orbital drag, which scientists call the Aotidal dissipation factor,Ao slows the planet each time it circles the star.
Just like the pulse rate, the blood pressure, sugar level etc, of a human are indicative of his health condition, the capacitance, leakage current, dissipation factor, polarization index, surge voltage with standing strength and partial discharge factors are indicative of the insulation condition of an electric rotating machine.
The viscous behavior can be defined in terms of the loss modulus, G" or E", but a more useful quantity is the dissipation factor, tan [delta] = G"/G' or E"/E', which is a direct measure of the amount of energy dissipated as heat.
0 to 10% weight, relative to the total weight of the composition, of a photoinitiator; and five to 50% weight, relative to the total weight of the composition, of one or more monofunctional diluents selected from the group consisting of alkyl (meth)acrylate monomers, N-vinyl functional diluents, and vinyl ether functional diluents; wherein the composition, after cure, has a dielectric dissipation factor at 60 Hz and 150[degrees]C of lower than about 0.
Knowing of a problem beforehand might give you an opportunity to design it right the first time, perhaps using a wider line, a shorter length, a lower dissipation factor laminate, routing on a surface microstrip, or a silicon processing technique such as TX or RX equalization.
However, to get a deeper insight into the dielectric nature of the material, additional parameters like dielectric loss ([epsilon]"), dissipation factor (tan [delta]), dielectric constant ([epsilon]'), electrical resistivity ([rho]) and conductance (K) are needed.
Designed for small-diameter coaxial cables and tubing applications that are run at high reduction ratios (from 200:1 to 4000:1), it is said to be ideal for high frequency insulating applications, 5 GHz and higher, because of its low, uniform dielectric constant and dissipation factor over a wide frequency range.
In the low voltage lab, technicians test board for dielectric constant, resistivity, and dissipation factor.