disorder

(redirected from dissociative disorder)
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Related to dissociative disorder: dissociative identity disorder, depersonalization disorder, borderline personality disorder, somatoform disorder, Dissociative Fugue, Dissociative amnesia

disorder

[dis′ȯrd·ər]
(crystallography)
Departures from regularity in the occupation of lattice sites in a crystal containing more than one element.
References in periodicals archive ?
To date, this was the only study considering relationships of academic competence in terms of GPA with PTSD and DES-taxon membership, which is an indicator of dissociative disorders among a group to which a precedence exposed a severe earthquake.
Clinicians who treat dissociative disorders are also faced with challenges because these disorders are a symptomatic enigma (Dell, 2009; Gillig, 2009).
For example, in a study, Ross and Keyes (2004) administered the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS) to 60 schizophrenic patients to categorize them in to high dissociation and low dissociation subgroups.
There is some support for a partial biological etiology of eating disorders but relatively little for the dissociative disorders, except for the rarely diagnosed depersonalization disorder.
Some dissociative disorder specialty programs are already changing their names to trauma programs to avoid the dreaded DID term.
It focuses much of its attention on helping educate and train clinicians to treat complex traumatic stress disorders and dissociative disorders.
For many people in the general population this type of dissociative experience is reportedly a familiar part of everyday life (Ross, Joshi, & Currie, 1990), although in some cases dissociative processes may become more patholo gical, possibly to the extent that they constitute one of the psychological dysfunctions known formally as the dissociative disorders (D.
Confirmation of childhood abuse in child and adolescent cases of multiple personality and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified.
This chapter discusses the 5 types of DDs recognized by the Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV): Dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, depersonalization disorder, dissociative identity disorder (also known as multiple personality disorder), and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified.
The contributors of these dozen or so articles take the high road in allowing for differences inherent in this population and by focusing on conditions clinicians are most likely to encounter, including changes in cognitive functioning, alcohol use, schizophrenia, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, complex chronic dissociative disorder, sexual problems, eating disorders, and borderline personality disorders across the life span.

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