disorder

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disorder

[dis′ȯrd·ər]
(crystallography)
Departures from regularity in the occupation of lattice sites in a crystal containing more than one element.
References in periodicals archive ?
1992) reported that out of 100 adults experiencing chemical dependency problems, 39% were also experiencing a diagnosable dissociative disorder (including 14% with DID).
We selected four mental disorders that are presumed to have different degrees of biological etiology: schizophrenia, major depression, eating disorders, and dissociative disorders.
Secondly, many patients with DSM-IV Conversion Disorder present the clinical configuration of a dissociative disorder.
Some dissociative disorder specialty programs are already changing their names to trauma programs to avoid the dreaded DID term.
There is a general consensus that dissociative disorder is more common in the females and the onset can be at any age across the life span of the affected individual5.
Attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder and dissociative disorder among abused children.
2006, Axis I dissociative disorder comorbidity in borderline personality disorder and reports of childhood trauma, Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 67, 10, 1583-1590.
There is such a strong association between complex trauma (particularly a history of early childhood abuse) and dissociation (both dissociative disorders and dissociative experience; Gingrich, 2005a; 2009) that it merits consideration here.
dissociative disorder, adjustment disorder, or schizophrenia.
A diagnosis of PTSD or dissociative disorder requires a history of trauma, which Mr.
This chapter discusses the 5 types of DDs recognized by the Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV): Dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, depersonalization disorder, dissociative identity disorder (also known as multiple personality disorder), and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified.
The contributors of these dozen or so articles take the high road in allowing for differences inherent in this population and by focusing on conditions clinicians are most likely to encounter, including changes in cognitive functioning, alcohol use, schizophrenia, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, complex chronic dissociative disorder, sexual problems, eating disorders, and borderline personality disorders across the life span.

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