dissonance

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Related to dissonances: Dissonance theory

dissonance

, dissonancy
Music a sensation commonly associated with all intervals of the second and seventh, all diminished and augmented intervals, and all chords based on these intervals

dissonance

see COGNITIVE DISSONANCE.

Dissonance

 

in music, the sounding of tones that do not “blend” with each other. (Dissonance should not be confused with cacophony, which is aesthetically unpleasing, disharmonic sound.) The opposite of dissonance is consonance.

Augmented and diminished seconds and sevenths, raised and lowered intervals, and any chords that contain any of these intervals are considered dissonant. With respect to the base a fourth is also considered dissonant. From a mathematical and acoustical point of view, dissonance is a more complicated ratio between the numbers of vibrations (length of the strings) than consonance, the difference between consonance and dissonance is only quantitative, and the line between them is conventional. From the standpoint of music psychology, dissonance is heard as a more tense or unstable sound than consonance. In the major and minor system the qualitative differences between consonance and dissonance achieve a degree of polarization and contrast and have great aesthetic value. This difference in the perception of dissonant and consonant sounds has always been considered in the study of composition. Until the 17th century the complete subordination of dissonance to consonance was the rule. Dissonant sounds were musically prepared for and resolved back into consonance. From the 17th to 19th centuries dissonances were always resolved. From the end of the 19th century and particularly in the 20th century dissonance was used more frequently and independently, without musical preparation and without resolution.

REFERENCES

Garbuzov, N. A. “O konsoniruiushchikh i dissoniruiushchikh intervalakh.” Muzykal’noe obrazovanie, 1930, nos. 4-5.
Kleshchov, S. V. “K voprosu o razlichii dissoniruiushchikh i konsoniruiushchikh sozvuchii.” Trudy fiziologicheskikh laboratorii akademika I. P P. Pavlova, 1941, no. 10.
Tiulin, Lu. N. “Sovremennaia garmoniia i ee istoricheskoe proiskhozhdenie.” In Voprosy sovremennoi muzyki. Leningrad, 1963.
Helmholtz, H. Uchenie o slukhovykh oshchushcheniiakh kak fiziologicheskaia osnova dlia teorii muzyki. St. Petersburg, 1875. (Translated from German.)
Stumpf, C. Konsonanz und Dissonanz. Leipzig, 1898.
Riemann, H. “Zur Theorie der Konsonanz und Dissonanz.” In the collection Präludien und Studien, vol. 3. Leipzig, 1910.

IU. N. KHOLOPOV


Dissonance

 

a variety of assonant rhyme in which the accented vowels differ—for example, slóvo, sléva, and slava. The sound repetition is constructed with consonants; consequently, dissonance is often called consonance. Dissonance, a rarely used but expressive technique, is an innovation of 20th-century poetry. Examples of dissonance appear in the following:

Na poberezh’e posle burl
Tvoikh kamnei ia slyshu khrust,
O, more, samyi umnyi v mire
Khudozhnik-abstraktsionist!

L. N. Martynov

dissonance

[′dis·ə·nəns]
(acoustics)
An unpleasant combination of harmonics heard when certain musical tones are played simultaneously. Also known as discord.
References in periodicals archive ?
It can be argued that there are occasions in which consonances are seen as dependent on conceptually prior dissonances, but such occurrences are generally less common in tonal music.
The key factors are the increases in dissonances and cross-relations.
Traditional consonance and dissonance in species counterpoint can be summarized as in Example 1.
But a graduated approach with the modal consonance as intermediary between tonal consonance and dissonance seems preferable, since the degree of tonal projection varies widely from piece to piece.
In particular, there is a strident dissonance between the D[natural] of the right hand versus the D[sharp] of the left.
Another measure of potential dissonance in an exercise is the interval between the modal tonics.
A range of potential dissonance between the two parts can be developed by cycling one of the parent scales sequentialiy through the circle of fifths while fixing the other.
it is God," and thus comprises a tacit recognition of the important role which dissonance must play for democracy and theology alike, then perhaps this music could be said to suit Lee's grand image of the statue, city, and harbor.
In this respect, Coltrane's exploration of dissonance within the dynamic of a music openly dedicated to divinity itself marks his indomitable resolve, his will to negate facile spirituality.
is that here the various possibilities of the human spirit confront us not just as visions of harmonic reconciliation, but with the full, jarring force of their irresolvable dissonance, an intractability to bland homogeneity which, when acknowledged as such, is no cause for despair, but the actual, persistent, radiant sign of democracy's promise, its enduring source of unhopeful hope.
But it is, I would argue, Bill Frisell whose recent work has been most insistent - and effective - in proclaiming the interdependence of an aesthetics of dissonance with democratic aspirations and ideals.
For a discussion of the ideological uses to which a merely coloristic dissonance may be put, see Attali and Adorno.