distant signal


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distant signal

[¦dis·tənt ′sig·nəl]
(civil engineering)
A signal placed at a distance from a block of track to give advance warning when the block is closed.
References in periodicals archive ?
license for distant signal retransmissions in the Satellite Home Viewer
I tried to apply the break 1,400 metres before Bachhrawan railway station, where distant signal was located.
It said in a statement, "STAVRA will not only extend satellite companies' ability to import distant signal for five more years, it will help curb skyrocketing blackouts and retrans fees by prohibiting joint retransmission consent negotiations, asking the FCC to reexamine its good faith negotiation rules and instructing the FCC to report retrans data as part of cable pricing reports.
The error in the measured field from the distant signal paths compared with the nearest path is computed using the following equation:
So do the other distant signal feeds relayed by Shaw, whether it be Canadian specialty channels, movies, or American channels such as CNN and A&E.
In a case involving the proposed microwave delivery of a distant television signal into Riverton, Wyoming, the Commission ruled that it could, and should, block the proposed importation of the distant signal on the basis that competition from the distant signal would harm the interest of the only broadcast station in the local market.
The Star Tribune also chose not to tell its readers that, in fact, when the actual distant signal was still in place, plaintiffs' attorney went to the scene and inspected it many times and took many photos and videos of the distant signal from every angle.
for the provision of second distant signal 11 stations at (Cph, Shivni, Bprh, Kothari Road, Madwarani, Srba, Plau, Urga, Krba, Kusumunda & Gad) & 1 Lc Gate Between (Urga-Krba Km.
ACA is pleased that the House Judiciary Committee rejected the National Association of Broadcasters' calls to eliminate cable's distant signal copyright license, which in many cases allows cable consumers to view TV signals that actually provide news and weather reports relevant to their communities.
When the distant signal was on, a vacuum valve opened in the shoe, which sounded a siren.
Before 1980, the FCC also restricted cable systems in the number of distant signals they could carry (the distant signal carriage rules) and required them to black-out programming on a distant signal where the local broadcaster had purchased the exclusive rights to that same programming (the syndicated exclusivity or syndex rules).
The Company is also currently in active negotiations for the sale of the remaining distant signal superstation business.