distinct


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distinct

1. Maths Logic (of a pair of entities) not identical
2. Botany (of parts of a plant) not joined together; separate
References in classic literature ?
When thus opposed he continually rolle his head from side to side, in a very odd manner, as if th power of distinct vision lay only in the anterior and basa part of each eye.
In these actions we apparently behold as perfect a transmission of will in the zoophyte, though composed o thousands of distinct polypi, as in any single animal.
What can be more remarkable tha to see a plant-like body producing an egg, capable of swimming about and of choosing a proper place to adhere to which then sprouts into branches, each crowded with innumerable distinct animals, often of complicated organizations The branches, moreover, as we have just seen, sometime possess organs capable of movement and independent of th polypi.
In the latter, the local or municipal authorities form distinct and independent portions of the supremacy, no more subject, within their respective spheres, to the general authority, than the general authority is subject to them, within its own sphere.
When we bear in mind that Britain has now hardly one peculiar mammal, and France but few distinct from those of Germany and conversely, and so with Hungary, Spain, &c.
Several other less distinct breeds might have been specified.
The following items may appear to create a separate and distinct intangible, but need not be capitalized, under Regs.
From the carnivorous Eucyon arose three distinct species of various body sizes and shapes--with different hunting and feeding habits.
Her preliminary results suggest that West African elephants not included in the new study are genetically very distinct.
A generous amount of light is provided to see by, and combat the long winter night, while this same light is treated to create mood, and conjure up an atmosphere distinct to the North.
In both parts, the gallery was subtly reconfigured to create distinct territorial quadrants--or architectural chambers--housing the encyclopedic range of Mullican's scavenged materials and signs.