distinct

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distinct

1. Maths Logic (of a pair of entities) not identical
2. Botany (of parts of a plant) not joined together; separate
References in classic literature ?
Thus we perceive that the distinctions insisted upon were not within the contemplation of this enlightened civilian; and we shall be led to conclude, that they are the novel refinements of an erroneous theory.
Hence, in their fits of fury, they remember no claims and recognize no distinctions.
But we must keep alive in the vernacular the distinction between fashion, a word of narrow and often sinister meaning, and the heroic character which the gentleman imports.
At King's School, as at Blackstable Vicarage, a tradesman was anyone who was not lucky enough to own land (and here a fine distinction was made between the gentleman farmer and the landowner), or did not follow one of the four professions to which it was possible for a gentleman to belong.
Coleridge and other English critics at the beginning of the present century had a great deal to say concerning a psychological distinction of much importance (as it appeared to them) between the fancy and the imagination.
Wait a little--I have kept his chief distinction till the last.
Thinking it a mark of distinction, the Dog grew proud of his bell and went tinkling it all over the marketplace.
JAMRACH the Rich, being anxious to reach the City of Political Distinction before nightfall, arrived at a fork of the road and was undecided which branch to follow; so he consulted a Wise-Looking Person who sat by the wayside.
They are waiting to be told by a person of distinction whether they are, or are not, to recognize your marriage.
This distinction is important, when the cause of the sterility, which is common to the two cases, has to be considered.
Avarice presently treated this with ridicule, called it a distinction without a difference, and absolutely insisted that when once all pretensions of honour and virtue were given up in any one instance, that there was no precedent for resorting to them upon a second occasion.
We may illustrate the distinction by a quotation from William James ("Psychology," i,