disturbance


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disturbance

1. Law an interference with another's rights
2. Geology
a. a minor movement of the earth causing a small earthquake
b. a minor mountain-building event
3. Meteorol a small depression
4. Psychiatry a mental or emotional disorder

disturbance

[də′stər·bəns]
(communications)
An undesired interference or noise signal affecting radio, television, or facsimile reception.
(control systems)
An undesired command signal in a control system.
(geology)
Folding or faulting of rock or a stratum from its original position.
(meteorology)
Any low or cyclone, but usually one that is relatively small in size and effect.
An area where weather, wind, pressure, and so on show signs of the development of cyclonic circulation.
Any deviation in flow or pressure that is associated with a disturbed state of the weather, such as cloudiness and precipitation.
Any individual circulatory system within the primary circulation of the atmosphere.
References in classic literature ?
Let him stay," said David, with desperate resignation, frightened above all things at the idea of further disturbances in his shop, which would make his exposure all the more conspicuous.
So now the apparently causeless movement of the herbage and the slow, undeviating approach of the line of disturbance were distinctly disquieting.
When he hurried that confidential servant, it was a sure sign of disturbance in the inner man.
These latter circumstances were observed in the Bay of Valparaiso during the earthquake of 1822; they may, I think, be accounted for, by the disturbance of the mud at the bottom of the sea containing organic matter in decay.
Margaret had expected the disturbance, and was not irritated by it.
A human body, like a mass of dynamite, contains a store of energy in unstable equilibrium, ready to be directed in this direction or that by a disturbance which is physically very small, such as a spoken word.
When returning from the races Anna had informed him of her relations with Vronsky, and immediately afterwards had burst into tears, hiding her face in her hands, Alexey Alexandrovitch, for all the fury aroused in him against her, was aware at the same time of a rush of that emotional disturbance always produced in him by tears.
the charms of Aouda failed to act, to Passepartout's great surprise; and the disturbances, if they existed, would have been more difficult to calculate than those of Uranus which led to the discovery of Neptune.
Even in the constitutional realm of Trade Winds, north and south of the equator, ships are overtaken by strange disturbances.
The situation of the place will also sometimes occasion disturbances in the state when the ground is not well adapted for one city; as at Clazomene, where the people who lived in that part of the town called Chytrum quarrelled with them who lived in the island, and the Colophonians with the Notians.
Another set pretended that out of one thousand new moons that had been observed, nine hundred and fifty had been attended with remarkable disturbances, such as cataclysms, revolutions, earthquakes, the deluge, etc.
But then, at a distance which for three hours in the morning did not exceed sixty-five miles, and in a medium free from all atmospheric disturbances, these instruments could reduce the lunar surface to within less than