diurnal migration

diurnal migration

[dī′ərn·əl mī′grā·shən]
(biology)
The daily rhythmic movements of organisms in the sea from deeper water to the surface at the approach of darkness and their return to deeper water before dawn.
References in periodicals archive ?
Theories for why nocturnal migration is more common than diurnal migration among passerines include: nocturnal migration maximizes day-time feeding opportunities, provides more stable atmospheric conditions for migration, allows migrating birds to take advantage of cooler temperatures to lower heat stress and dehydration, and minimizes predation pressure from diurnal raptors (Alerstam 1990, Able 2001).
Many species of North American finches thought to be virtually exclusive diurnal migrants, including Pine Siskin, have been recorded producing flight calls in the hour before sunrise as they begin their diurnal migrations (Evans and O'Brien 2002).
Diurnal migration of passerine birds over south Sweden in relation to wind direction and topography.