divagation

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divagation

[‚div·ə′gā·shən]
(hydrology)
Lateral shifting of the course of a stream caused by extensive deposition of alluvium in its bed and frequently accompanied by the development of meanders.
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Having pointed to features in Strauss that as it were snatch the avant-garde from the jaws of kitsch, Downes turns around and performs the opposite operation on Schoenberg, a composer whom long regnant academic shibboleths have insulated from the taint of decadence (attributed to him, in the standard narrative, only by the philistines of yore) and touted (though not without notorious divagations like Boulez's) as the fans et origo of an authentic avant-garde.
In one of his fragmentary divagations on craft in the first age of free verse, Pound cites Eliot's authority: "Eliot has said the thing very well when he said, 'No vers is libre for the man who wants to do a good job.
Surprisingly enough, the metafictional divagations about the reading pleasures that are included in the eighteenth-century novels are frequently dressed in erotic metaphors, comparable to those employed by Roland Barthes.
In each of Rabate's disparate divagations however, the critic keeps in play "an analysis of the replacement of the sublime aura of old with a network of clues and traces underpinned by murder," and this analysis he keeps up with a persuasive and precise critical dissection (193).
Rather, criticism finds itself caught in a dramatic web of many voices, citations, asides, divagations.
The iconic figure of Marx in China is a focus through which the author dissects the strange love affair between this inflexible ideologue whose divagations about the "withering away" of the state at the end of communism take no account of the differences among human beings--and the Chinese people, who explain away all inequities in their system by alluding to those who have failed to exemplify Marxist standards.
While closely following and cogently recounting Giannino's divagations, Falconieri persuasively illustrates the pertinence of the "merchant king's" small role in the larger historical picture of medieval Europe.
The "fresh form" embodied by Sontag's literary/philosophical divagations in AI I have already limned; but that "invented" by her film criticism in the same volume was equally arresting.
I do not wish to defend myself, but to attack; to attack before departure, and to attack these boneless dreary divagations from principle.
Indeed, the divagations of the Times form a revealing object lesson in the extent to which the earnest, fueled by the emotion of virtue, is often the enemy of the genuinely serious.
Originally published in French in the National Observer of Edinburgh on October 29, 1892, (5) reprinted in the Revue Blanche of December 1892, and collected in Mallarme's Divagations of 1897 and thereafter in his Oeuvres computes (pp.