divine

(redirected from diviner)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

divine

1. of, relating to, or characterizing God or a deity
2. of, relating to, or associated with religion or worship
3. another term for God
4. a priest, esp one learned in theology
References in periodicals archive ?
During the eclipse, lasting just over an hour, only Diviner keeps its eye on the moon, fulfilling a purpose totally outside the scope of its original design.
The Water Diviner is available on Blu-ray and DVD now, courtesy of Entertainment One.
The Water Diviner Cert 15 RUSSELL Crowe stars as an Australian farmer who travels to Turkey to find his three missing sons four years after the Battle of Gallipoli.
THE WATER DIVINER (15) RUGGED farmer Joshua Connor (Russell Crowe) possesses a rare gift for divining water, which he uses to irrigate the sprawling property he shares with his wife Eliza (Jacqueline McKenzie) and three sons (Ryan Corr, James Fraser, Ben O'Toole).
REVIEWS The Water Diviner (Cert 15, 106 mins, Entertainment One, also available to buy on DVD PS17.
Take the example of an honourable Anglophone vice-minister who praises a famous diviner (mungang man), just at the very moment Prospere wants to know the truth about his late wife and also to exonerate himself from rumour that has developed around it:
Making his directorial debut with the brawny and big-hearted Australian war drama "The Water Diviner,'' Russell Crowe taps a deep well of symbolism, cultural empathy and good old-fashioned storytelling.
Russell |Crowe stars and directs in The Water Diviner
Adapted for the big screen by Andrew Anastasios and Andrew Knight, e Water Diviner is a solid rst eort including well-choreographed scenes of conict and self-sacrice during the Gallipoli Campaign of the First World War in late 1915.
Directors Peter and Michael Spierig relish the twists and turns of their narrative, THE WAT HE W ER DIVINER (15) .
Adapted for the big screen by Andrew Anastasios and Andrew Knight, e Water Diviner is a solid rst e[euro]ort including well-choreographed scenes of conict and self-sacrice during the Gallipoli Campaign of the First World War in late 1915.