divine

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divine

1. of, relating to, or characterizing God or a deity
2. of, relating to, or associated with religion or worship
3. another term for God
4. a priest, esp one learned in theology
References in periodicals archive ?
He is at the mercy of the diviner in the desperate quest to know the truth about his wife's death.
It thus sets a man tic agenda for all diviners who would serve the king: interpret omens positively
Bray has proved that she can keep her readers on the edge of their seats and with The Diviners she moves into the occult, with bodies raised from the dead, portents of evil, charms that cause strange dreams: even verging on a new Frankenstein.
The Diviners is Book 1 of a planned four-book series.
Ubulawu preparations are a popular means of administering psychoactive plants in the traditional healing practices in southern Africa, yet many of the details of their use including their mechanisms of psychoactive action, psychological affects, cultural importance and their healing role in the initiation process of Southern Bantu diviners have been poorly researched.
has purchased the screen rights to "THE DIVINERS," an upcoming novel from New York Times bestselling author Libba Bray.
Diviners engaged by the temple trust had warned that the deity was not pleased with the developments and that the opening of vault B would bring trouble.
Even so, in 1891 the legislature made the decision (unique in South Africa) to grant official recognition through licensure to African midwives and herbalists, but not diviners.
As Stovel notes, both A Bird in the House and The Diviners are "metafictional Kiinstlerroman[e]" (225).
We know that clients will go to a clinic for tests via the diviners' advice and that they will return to the diviners who have, as they so movingly say, given them spirit.
This new study of Laurence's "complete writings" thus represents a kind of Stovelian masterwork, much as Laurence's own final novel, The Diviners (1974), brought together not only her four previous Manawaka fictions but also addressed the breadth of her literary development and range of interests.
Dating back as far as 1500 BC, they acted as priests, judges, doctors, diviners, sages scholars, and were considered among the wisest and most respected members of Celtic society.