divine

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Related to divinest: starkest

divine

1. of, relating to, or characterizing God or a deity
2. of, relating to, or associated with religion or worship
3. another term for God
4. a priest, esp one learned in theology
References in periodicals archive ?
Buckman's "'Much Madness Is Divinest Sense': Firefly's 'Big Damn Heroes' and Little Witches" is particularly helpful in interpreting River's feminist significance.
The juxtaposition is evident from the beginning of (8) when the logos is described as a 'powerful lord' ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), 'which by means of the finest and most invisible body effects the divinest works' ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).
Then come out those fiery effulgences, infernally superb; then the evil-blazing diamond, once the divinest symbol of the crystal skies, looks like some crown-jewel stolen from the King of Hell.
Women Writing of Divinest Things: Rhetoric and the Poetry of Pembroke, Wroth and Lanyer.
Much Madness is divinest Sense-- To a discerning Eye-- Much Sense--the starkest Madness-- 'Tis the Majority In this, as All, prevail-- Assent--and you are sane-- Demur--you're straightway dangerous-- And handled with a Chain-- --Emily Dickinson (1)
His problem was 'believing / everything he read, the divinest poets / told the sublimest lies' (p.
They are but pigmy performers, yet they dance with inimitable grace and vast good-will, and consider me as the divinest musician in the world' so, thank heaven I have at last found auditors who can appreciate my musical talents.
strongest, the divinest thing in man; so I presume is it in God, for
I could heere (eeven with the feather of my pen) wipe off other ridiculous imputations: but my best way to answer them, is to laugh at them: onely that much I protest (and sweare by the divinest part of true Poesie) that (howsoever the limmes of my naked lines may bee and I know have bin, tortur'd on the racke) they are free from conspiring the least disgrace to any man, but onely to our new Horace; neyther should this ghost of Tucca, have walkt up and downe Poules Church-yard, but that hee was raiz'd up (in print) by newe Exorcismes.