divinyl

divinyl

[dī′vīn·əl]
(organic chemistry)
A molecule that has two vinyl groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although this works for many monomers, styrene and divinyl benzene, alone or with a porogen, are preferred.
A gel permeation chromatograph (Model 500, Analytical Scientific Instruments, USA) with a refractive index detector (RI2000, Schambeck, Germany) and two Jordi gel divinyl benzene mixed bed (Jordi FLP, USA) columns were used to measure the molecular weight relative to the polystyrene standards at 30[degrees]C.
Fukuda, "Nitroxide-Controlled Free-Radical Copolymerization of Vinyl and Divinyl Monomers.
In an alternative embodiment, the polymer comprises vinyl functional polydimethyl siloxane, and preferably high molecular weight methyl divinyl siloxane, with or without phenyl substituted siloxane.
occur in the divinyl (DV) form, namely 8-desethyl, 8-vinyl chlorophyll a (chl [a.
2000) obtained for epoxy-based divinyl ester and epoxy fumerate resins, respectively.
5) Modified by some hydroxyl-containing compounds, the melting point of aliphatic urethane divinyl ether crystalline monomer can be decreased to around 75-90[degrees]C, which is suitable for UV-curable powder coatings.
The use of divinyl sulfone (DVS) as the linker arm molecule for forming cyclosporine and cyclosporine metabolite protein conjugate immunogens is described.
The novel agarose was activated by methods known before: using cyanogen bromide [45, 46], divinyl sulphone [47], 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole [48], active dyes [49], and some others (Table 1).
The researchers used a cheap, industrial solvent called divinyl sulfone that can be bought by the gallon and has been used for decades as an adhesive.
With this in mind, divinyl terminated PDMDPS was chosen as the basis for the development of the desired polymer.