Lobby

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lobby

1. a room or corridor used as an entrance hall, vestibule, etc.
2. Chiefly Brit a hall in a legislative building used for meetings between the legislators and members of the public
3. Chiefly Brit one of two corridors in a legislative building in which members vote
4. a group of persons who attempt to influence legislators on behalf of a particular interest

Lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, hotel, or other structure.

Lobby

 

auxiliary premises in parliamentary and other government buildings, as well as in theaters and concert halls, designed for rest during breaks between sessions or during intermissions. Lobbies are also used for unofficial meetings and exchange of opinions and often serve as work areas for journalists. The expression “lobbying” characterizes behind-the-scenes deals made in capitalist legislative institutions by representatives of the ruling circles who are close to members of the institutions or to high government officials.


Lobby

 

the system of offices and agencies of the major monopolies assigned to legislative bodies of the USA. Lobbies exert direct pressure on legislators and state officials even to the point of bribery for the sake of the companies involved.

lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the vote on the second reading, Tony Blair's majority was halved to 74 as 29 Labour MPs joined the Tories and Lib Dems in the division lobbies.
Hereditary peers, some of great antiquity, and their fellow "lifers", shuffled through the division lobbies to take the House of Lords to death's door and ultimate extinction in its present form.
euro]e 50 rebel Tories marched through the division lobbies with us at the 10 o'clock vote but three Liberals failed to turn up.
And she will ( the MP is already preparing to grab the Chancellor the next time they're together in the division lobbies.
Apart from Mrs Hesford, five others who had originally signed the motion against the Bill decided to back it in the division lobbies.
And every time, they swallow their principles and troop obediently through the division lobbies in support of Blair's chicanery.
That was among Mr Cook's chief concerns when he trooped through the division lobbies alongside 61 other Labour rebels, plus opposition MPs.
That will make sure there's no repeat of the Westminster spectacle of MPs shuffling off into the division lobbies.
The premier was said to have approached his MP outside the division lobbies and accused him of not behaving "honourably".
Then, there will be an ``I told you so'' atmosphere among the 140 or so Labour MPs who have been prepared to defy the the Prime Minister in the division lobbies of the House of Commons.

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