Jinn

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Jinn

 

(Arabic, literally “spirit”), in the Koran a fantastic substance created by Allah from pure, smokeless fire. There are two types of jinns: those converted to Islam that do good deeds and those that are faithless deluders of people and bearers of disease. According to believers, jinns are capable of assuming various forms and living inside of people, animals, and plants. The concept of the jinn existed in pre-Islamic Arabic pagan mythology. With the spread of Islam, belief in jinns became partially incorporated into other peoples’ beliefs (for example, the Persians).

jinn

(genii) class of demon assuming animal/human form. [Arab. Myth.: Benét, 13, 521]
See: Demon
References in periodicals archive ?
To download the films, visit iTunes here: From A to B , Sea Shadow and Djinn .
I told her the djinn was inside you, she said 'you need medical help.
She said the djinn was powerful and he would not let my daughter marry any man," the mother told court.
We want to thank everyone who has gone out to see Djinn as it is a big step forward for film making in the country.
The RnD team at Drishti have come up with their own innovation in soft phones called the Djinn Phone.
Wearing a red-white-and-blue suit and, intermittently, whiteface makeup, he haunts a Baroque church and a commuter train; like some diasporic djinn, he break-dances, rides a unicycle, finds himself bound to a tree, and then, mysteriously, walks away.
Demented Abuhamza became convinced that Khyra's innocent face concealed a djinn, a spirit which Muslims believe can possess humans to carry out black magic.
I mean it as if each Coca-Cola bottle contained a djinn, as if that djinn was our great American civilization ready to spring out of each bottle and cover the whole global universe with its great wide wings.
After his wife hires someone to drive out the djinn from inside him, he essentially leaves his house forever.
Among the other propositions for the admirers of French cinema are Of Gods and Men by Xavier Beauvois (winner of the Jury's Grand Prix Award at Cannes); Copacabana by Marc Fitoussi (starring Isabelle Huppert); Leaving by Catherine Corsini (starring Kristin Scott Thomas and Sergi Lopez); director and actor Mathieu Almaric's On Tour; The Concert by Radu Mihaileanu; two experimental debuts--Donoma by Djinn Car-renard and Flowers of Evil by David Dusa; and the documentary Nenette by Nicolas Philibert.
In her chapter on the fairy stories in The Djinn in the Nightingale's Eye (1994), Campbell explains how Byatt subverts patriarchal conventions of the fairy-tale genre without producing mere feminist propaganda.
Bartimaeus the djinn especially chafes at the labor, and for his insolence gets sent to the even less desirable task of hunting bandits in the desert.