do-not-track

do-not-track

An appeal from the browser to the website to not track the user's surfing habits. Firefox was the first browser to include a do-not-track option for the user, and the others followed. However, the reason this is an "appeal" is because it relies on the cooperation of tracking companies that are self-regulating and offer an opt-out function. However, most of the large ad networks in the U.S. are compliant.

The "do-not-track=yes" is a header in the HTTP request for a Web page that is sent to the website. See tracking cookie and Web bug.


Firefox Privacy Setting
Clicking this box sends a DNT header with all Web page requests. Firefox was the first Web browser to offer this, and the others followed.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Worst, there are advertising companies that collect online behavior, and track you even with the Do-Not-Track setting on your browser.
As part of Rockefeller's longstanding efforts to protect consumer online privacy, Rockefeller introduced the Do-Not-Track Online Act of 2013, in February 2013, which would allow consumers to control their personal information and prevent online companies from collecting and using that information for profit.
The increasing frequency of point-of-sale breaches and do-not-track class-action law suits are described as an evolving cyber exposure.
Advertisers and content suppliers indicate the advantages of third-party information for ad usefulness, holding that do-not-track would negatively affect their businesses and harm users.
The W3C committee, which has been at work on a standard since September 2011, released a statement in which it said the DAA proposal would have led to "widespread confusion if consumers select a do-not-track option only to have targeting and collection continue unchanged.
Add to that the patchwork of brokers that may offer "opt-out" or some logo-based do-not-track systems along with the ever-growing number of brokers, and it's clear we need a consistent and perhaps standard method of transparency.
A voluntary effort by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) to develop a unified voluntary approach to Do-Not-Track browsing will resume this year with new leadership.
The new version brings with it support for right-to-left scripts such as Urdu, Hebrew, Arabic and Farsi, along with newer themes and better support for web standards such as CSS3 and HTML5, along with support for a do-not-track option, akin to browsers such as Mozilla Firefox (read our Firefox 13 review) and Google Chrome.
It would give consumers the right to know what information is being collected about them, and it calls for do-not-track technology in most major web browsers to make it easier for users to control online tracking.
Online tracking is fueling national debate over whether new do-not-track laws are needed to safeguard consumers' online privacy.
Neither of the privacy proposals introduced in April had a do-not-track provision, so bills with that requirement have been introduced in both the House and Senate.
It suggested allowing consumers to choose how much of their personal information to share by creating a do-not-track system similar to its popular do-not-call list.