doctrine

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Related to doctrinal: Doctrinal statement

doctrine

a creed or body of teachings of a religious, political, or philosophical group presented for acceptance or belief; dogma
References in periodicals archive ?
The right sees it as an issue of doctrinal dissent and tolerance of a gay subculture in the priesthood and in Catholic seminaries.
At the level of doctrines, one has to bear in mind that the Muslim Brotherhood's mainstream has always adopted a moderate position toward Shiism as a doctrine and has refused to nurture the doctrinal differences between Sunnis and Shiites despite acknowledging the presence of clear differences between the two doctrines.
The CCTT simulators train armor, cavalry, and mechanized infantry platoons through battalion and task force on doctrinal mission training plan collective tasks.
The conflict between LCWR and the doctrinal congregation has become the most visible manifestation of this highly charged issue.
Despite these gains, one topic remains a serious obstacle to Christian unity and yet has failed to receive extensive consideration in any church-sanctioned dialogue: doctrinal teaching authority.
We are currently working to improve the doctrinal articulation of cultural considerations and cultural awareness within intelligence operations and also across the broader scope of combined arms doctrine.
As the Congregation For the Doctrine of the Faith's doctrinal note of November 2002, observes, the Second Vatican Council actually exhorts Christians "to fulfill their duties Faithfully in the spirit of the Gospel.
As doctrinal supervisor, he had no doubts about the truth and no qualms about imposing it.
Zinzendorf (1700-1760) visited America in 1741-1743 and was part of the movement known as the Great Awakening, Zinzendorf downplayed doctrinal and liturgical differences and even asserted in one sermon that baptism itself has become too much of a stumbling block.
Histories of preaching have been in circulation for a long time, but until recently sermons have been studied either as works of literature or as bases from which to infer the preacher's doctrinal positions.
Today, however, there are more and more people who consider the possibility of being Christian as a personal attitude, even without belonging to Christendom or totally adhering to doctrinal dogmas of Christianity, insofar as the former represents institutional structures and the latter a special doctrinal set-up.